Relationship between Selected Strength and Power Assessments to Peak and Average Velocity of the Drive Block in Offensive Line Play

Bert H. Jacobson, Eric C. Conchola, Doug B. Smith, Kazuma Akehi, Rob G. Glass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Jacobson, BH, Conchola, EC, Smith, DB, Akehi, K, and Glass, RG. Relationship between selected strength and power assessments to peak and average velocity of the drive block in offensive line play. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2202-2205, 2016 - Typical strength training for football includes the squat and power clean (PC) and routinely measured variables include 1 repetition maximum (1RM) squat and 1RM PC along with the vertical jump (VJ) for power. However, little research exists regarding the association between the strength exercises and velocity of an actual on-the-field performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of peak velocity (PV) and average velocity (AV) of the offensive line drive block to 1RM squat, 1RM PC, the VJ, body mass (BM), and body composition. One repetition maximum assessments for the squat and PC were recorded along with VJ height, BM, and percent body fat. These data were correlated with PV and AV while performing the drive block. Peal velocity and AV were assessed using a Tendo Power and Speed Analyzer as the linemen fired, from a 3-point stance into a stationary blocking dummy. Pearson product analysis yielded significant (p ≤ 0.05) correlations between PV and AV and the VJ, the squat, and the PC. A significant inverse association was found for both PV and AV and body fat. These data help to confirm that the typical exercises recommended for American football linemen is positively associated with both PV and AV needed for the drive block effectiveness. It is recommended that these exercises remain the focus of a weight room protocol and that ancillary exercises be built around these exercises. Additionally, efforts to reduce body fat are recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2202-2205
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of strength and conditioning research
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Adipose Tissue
Football
Body Height
Resistance Training
Body Composition
Glass
Weights and Measures
Research

Keywords

  • football
  • linemen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Relationship between Selected Strength and Power Assessments to Peak and Average Velocity of the Drive Block in Offensive Line Play. / Jacobson, Bert H.; Conchola, Eric C.; Smith, Doug B.; Akehi, Kazuma; Glass, Rob G.

In: Journal of strength and conditioning research, Vol. 30, No. 8, 01.08.2016, p. 2202-2205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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