Relationship between measures of body size and composition and velocity of lactate threshold

Robert J. Buresh, Kris E. Berg, John M Noble

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to explore the relationship between velocity of lactate threshold (vLT) and various measures of body mass and composition: mass, lean mass, fat mass, percent body fat (% fat), and body surface area (BSA). We hypothesized that mass would be inversely related to vLT, and that differences in measures of body mass and composition would account for a significant amount of variability in vLT. A total of 21 healthy male runners served as subjects. Body composition was assessed by hydrostatic weighing. A significant negative relationship (r = -0.759, p ≤ 0.01) was between body mass and vLT. The coefficient of determination between vLT and body mass indicated that nearly 58% of the variability in vLT was explained by body mass in these subjects. Significant relationships were also between vLT and BSA (r = -0.72, p ≤ 0.01), fat mass (r = -0.70, p ≤ 0.01), % fat (r = -0.59, p ≤ 0.01), and lean mass (r = -0.41, p ≤ 0.05). Linear regression yielded the following model: y = 369.48 - 1.7343 (X), where y = predicted vLT (m-min -1) and X = body mass (kilograms) (SEE = 15.45). Velocity of lactate threshold was significantly inversely related with body mass in a group of male runners. The calculated coefficient of determination suggests that nearly 58% of the variability in vLT was explained by body mass. The present data suggest consideration of categorizing participants in 'road runs' by body mass to equate competition, as is done in other sports (e.g., weightlifting).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)504-507
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of strength and conditioning research
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004

Fingerprint

Body Size
Body Composition
Lactic Acid
Body Surface Area
Fats
Fat Body
Sports
Adipose Tissue
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Allometric scaling
  • Anaerobic threshold
  • Onset of blood lactic acid
  • dMax method

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Relationship between measures of body size and composition and velocity of lactate threshold. / Buresh, Robert J.; Berg, Kris E.; Noble, John M.

In: Journal of strength and conditioning research, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.08.2004, p. 504-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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