Regulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis in depression.

Samuel Sathyanesan, Ronald S. Duman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The characterization of depression as a treatable disease has led to very significant research aimed at understanding disease mechanisms and treatments. Antidepressant therapy, employing chemical and non-chemical antidepressants are quite successful in treatment of the disorder although their mechanism of action is not well understood. Basic research with rodent models is providing vital evidence concerning the molecules and mechanisms involved in antidepressant action. The regulation of neurotrophic and growth factors observed after antidepressant administration is seen as playing an important role in modulating the therapeutic effects of antidepressants. Recently, adult neurogenesis or the birth of new neurons has emerged as a physiological phenomenon necessary for the behavioral response of antidepressant treatment. Equally interesting are correlative associations between neurogenesis and angiogenesis or the birth of new vasculature. Growth factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) play vital roles in both these phenomena making the interplay of neurogenesis and angiogenesis an exciting avenue of brain research. This review will focus on the research that has led us to this current understanding of antidepressant action in context with the pathophysiology of depression using examples from basic, preclinical and clinical investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-267
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent neurovascular research
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Neurogenesis
Antidepressive Agents
Research
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Parturition
Physiological Phenomena
Fibroblast Growth Factors
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Nerve Growth Factors
Therapeutic Uses
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Rodentia
Neurons
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Regulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis in depression. / Sathyanesan, Samuel; Duman, Ronald S.

In: Current neurovascular research, Vol. 1, No. 3, 01.01.2004, p. 261-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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