Recruitment for an internet-based diabetes self-management program: Scientific and ethical implications

Russell E. Glasgow, Lisa A. Strycker, Deanna Kurz, Andrew Faber, Hillary Bell, Jennifer M. Dickman, Eve Halterman, Paul A. Estabrooks, Diego Osuna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the reach of Internet self-management interventions. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate different definitions of participation rate and compare characteristics among subcategories of participants and nonparticipants on demographic and clinical factors using de-identified electronic medical record data. Methods: Data are presented on recruitment results and characteristics of 2,603 health maintenance organization members having type 2 diabetes invited to participate in an Internet self-management program. Results: There was a 37% participation rate among all members attempted to contact and presumed eligible. There were several significant differences between participants and nonparticipants and among subgroups of participants (e.g., proactive volunteers vs. telephone respondents) on factors including age, income, ethnicity, smoking rate, education, blood pressure, and hemoglobin A1c. Conclusion: These results have important implications for the impact of different recruitment methods on health disparities and generalization of results. We provide recommendations for reporting of eligibility rate, participation rate, and representativeness analyses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-48
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

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Self Care
Internet
Health Maintenance Organizations
Electronic Health Records
Age Factors
Telephone
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Volunteers
Hemoglobins
Smoking
Demography
Blood Pressure
Education
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Clinical trials
  • Participation
  • Recruitment
  • Representativeness
  • Research methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Glasgow, R. E., Strycker, L. A., Kurz, D., Faber, A., Bell, H., Dickman, J. M., ... Osuna, D. (2010). Recruitment for an internet-based diabetes self-management program: Scientific and ethical implications. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 40(1), 40-48. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-010-9189-1

Recruitment for an internet-based diabetes self-management program : Scientific and ethical implications. / Glasgow, Russell E.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Kurz, Deanna; Faber, Andrew; Bell, Hillary; Dickman, Jennifer M.; Halterman, Eve; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Osuna, Diego.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.08.2010, p. 40-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glasgow, RE, Strycker, LA, Kurz, D, Faber, A, Bell, H, Dickman, JM, Halterman, E, Estabrooks, PA & Osuna, D 2010, 'Recruitment for an internet-based diabetes self-management program: Scientific and ethical implications', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 40-48. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-010-9189-1
Glasgow, Russell E. ; Strycker, Lisa A. ; Kurz, Deanna ; Faber, Andrew ; Bell, Hillary ; Dickman, Jennifer M. ; Halterman, Eve ; Estabrooks, Paul A. ; Osuna, Diego. / Recruitment for an internet-based diabetes self-management program : Scientific and ethical implications. In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 40-48.
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