Reconsidering contact precautions for endemic methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus

Daniel J. Morgan, Rekha Murthy, L. Silvia Munoz-Price, Marsha Barnden, Bernard C. Camins, B. Lynn Johnston, Zachary Rubin, Kaede V. Sullivan, Andi L. Shane, E. Patchen Dellinger, Mark Edmund Rupp, Gonzalo Bearman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

background. Whether contact precautions (CP) are required to control the endemic transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) in acute care hospitals is controversial in light of improvements in hand hygiene, MRSA decolonization, environmental cleaning and disinfection, fomite elimination, and chlorhexidine bathing. objective. To provide a framework for decision making around use of CP for endemic MRSA and VRE based on a summary of evidence related to use of CP, including impact on patients and patient care processes, and current practices in use of CP for MRSA and VRE in US hospitals. design. A literature review, a survey of Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network members on use of CP, and a detailed examination of the experience of a convenience sample of hospitals not using CP for MRSA or VRE. participants. Hospital epidemiologists and infection prevention experts. results. No high quality data support or reject use of CP for endemic MRSA or VRE. Our survey found more than 90% of responding hospitals currently use CP for MRSA and VRE, but approximately 60% are interested in using CP in a different manner. More than 30 US hospitals do not use CP for control of endemic MRSA or VRE. conclusions. Higher quality research on the benefits and harms of CP in the control of endemic MRSA and VRE is needed. Until more definitive data are available, the use of CP for endemic MRSA or VRE in acute care hospitals should be guided by local needs and resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1163-1172
Number of pages10
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume36
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Fomites
Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci
Hand Hygiene
Chlorhexidine
Disinfection
Cross Infection
Research
Decision Making
Patient Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Morgan, D. J., Murthy, R., Silvia Munoz-Price, L., Barnden, M., Camins, B. C., Lynn Johnston, B., ... Bearman, G. (2015). Reconsidering contact precautions for endemic methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 36(10), 1163-1172. https://doi.org/10.1017/ice.2015.156

Reconsidering contact precautions for endemic methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus. / Morgan, Daniel J.; Murthy, Rekha; Silvia Munoz-Price, L.; Barnden, Marsha; Camins, Bernard C.; Lynn Johnston, B.; Rubin, Zachary; Sullivan, Kaede V.; Shane, Andi L.; Patchen Dellinger, E.; Rupp, Mark Edmund; Bearman, Gonzalo.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 36, No. 10, 01.01.2015, p. 1163-1172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morgan, DJ, Murthy, R, Silvia Munoz-Price, L, Barnden, M, Camins, BC, Lynn Johnston, B, Rubin, Z, Sullivan, KV, Shane, AL, Patchen Dellinger, E, Rupp, ME & Bearman, G 2015, 'Reconsidering contact precautions for endemic methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus', Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, vol. 36, no. 10, pp. 1163-1172. https://doi.org/10.1017/ice.2015.156
Morgan, Daniel J. ; Murthy, Rekha ; Silvia Munoz-Price, L. ; Barnden, Marsha ; Camins, Bernard C. ; Lynn Johnston, B. ; Rubin, Zachary ; Sullivan, Kaede V. ; Shane, Andi L. ; Patchen Dellinger, E. ; Rupp, Mark Edmund ; Bearman, Gonzalo. / Reconsidering contact precautions for endemic methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus. In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 10. pp. 1163-1172.
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