Reaching parents to prevent adolescent risky behavior: Examining the effects of threat portrayal and parenting orientation on parental participation perceptions

John F. Tanner, Les A. Carlson, Mary Anne Raymond, Christopher D. Hopkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With more than two million teens affected, adolescents are the most at-risk group for unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. Parents, who teens cite as their most influential resource for making decisions about premarital sex, receive little consideration from federal initiatives. However, promoting more active parenting to parents to reduce risky behavior among teenagers seems to be an appropriate strategy. This study examines parents' reactions to advertisements that promote abstinence education programs. The results indicate that "warm" parents (i.e., those who indicate concern about children's interactions with the marketplace) are more likely to intend to communicate with their children about sex and have a more favorable attitude toward the ad when the advertisement is clear about the consequences of teens engaging in sex. The findings have implications for how public policy officials and agencies can influence parents as key socialization agents in efforts to prevent adolescents from engaging in risky sexual behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-155
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Public Policy and Marketing
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Participation
Threat
Risky behavior
Parenting
Teens
Decision making
Public policy
Sexual behavior
Sexually transmitted diseases
Abstinence
Attitude toward the ad
Resources
Interaction
Education
Pregnancy
Socialization
Teenagers

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Fear
  • Parents
  • Risk
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Socialization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

Cite this

Reaching parents to prevent adolescent risky behavior : Examining the effects of threat portrayal and parenting orientation on parental participation perceptions. / Tanner, John F.; Carlson, Les A.; Raymond, Mary Anne; Hopkins, Christopher D.

In: Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.01.2008, p. 149-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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