Rational emotive therapy with children and adolescents: A meta-analysis

Jorge E. Gonzalez, J. Ron Nelson, Terry B. Gutkin, Anita Saunders, Ann Galloway, Craig S. Shwery

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article systematically reviews the available research on rational emotive behavioral therapy (REBT) with children and adolescents. Meta-analytic procedures were applied to 19 studies that met inclusion criteria. The overall mean weighted effect of REBT was positive and significant. Weighted z r effect sizes were also computed for five outcome categories: anxiety, disruptive behaviors, irrationality, self-concept, and grade point average. In terms of magnitude, the largest positive mean effect of REBT was on disruptive behaviors. Analyses also revealed the following noteworthy findings: (a) there was no statistical difference between studies identified low or high in internal validity; (b) REBT appeared equally effective for children and adolescents presenting with and without identified problems; (c) non-mental health professionals produced REBT effects of greater magnitude than their mental health counterparts; (d) the longer the duration of REBT sessions, the greater the impact, and (e) children benefited more from REBT than adolescents. The findings are discussed in terms of several important limitations along with suggestions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-235
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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Meta-Analysis
adolescent
Therapeutics
self-concept
Self Concept
health professionals
Mental Health
Anxiety
mental health
inclusion
anxiety
Health
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Rational emotive therapy with children and adolescents : A meta-analysis. / Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Ron Nelson, J.; Gutkin, Terry B.; Saunders, Anita; Galloway, Ann; Shwery, Craig S.

In: Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.01.2004, p. 222-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Gonzalez, Jorge E. ; Ron Nelson, J. ; Gutkin, Terry B. ; Saunders, Anita ; Galloway, Ann ; Shwery, Craig S. / Rational emotive therapy with children and adolescents : A meta-analysis. In: Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. 2004 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 222-235.
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