Rainbow peacock spiders inspire miniature super-iridescent optics

Bor Kai Hsiung, Radwanul Hasan Siddique, Doekele G. Stavenga, Jürgen C. Otto, Michael C. Allen, Ying Liu, Yongfeng Lu, Dimitri D. Deheyn, Matthew D. Shawkey, Todd A. Blackledge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Colour produced by wavelength-dependent light scattering is a key component of visual communication in nature and acts particularly strongly in visual signalling by structurally-coloured animals during courtship. Two miniature peacock spiders (Maratus robinsoni and M. chrysomelas) court females using tiny structured scales (~ 40 × 10 μm2) that reflect the full visual spectrum. Using TEM and optical modelling, we show that the spiders' scales have 2D nanogratings on microscale 3D convex surfaces with at least twice the resolving power of a conventional 2D diffraction grating of the same period. Whereas the long optical path lengths required for light-dispersive components to resolve individual wavelengths constrain current spectrometers to bulky sizes, our nano-3D printed prototypes demonstrate that the design principle of the peacock spiders' scales could inspire novel, miniature light-dispersive components.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2278
JournalNature communications
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

spiders
Spiders
rainbows
Optics
optics
Visual communication
Light
Wavelength
Diffraction gratings
Optical resolving power
Light scattering
Courtship
Spectrometers
Animals
gratings (spectra)
Transmission electron microscopy
Color
optical paths
wavelengths
microbalances

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Hsiung, B. K., Siddique, R. H., Stavenga, D. G., Otto, J. C., Allen, M. C., Liu, Y., ... Blackledge, T. A. (2017). Rainbow peacock spiders inspire miniature super-iridescent optics. Nature communications, 8(1), [2278]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-02451-x

Rainbow peacock spiders inspire miniature super-iridescent optics. / Hsiung, Bor Kai; Siddique, Radwanul Hasan; Stavenga, Doekele G.; Otto, Jürgen C.; Allen, Michael C.; Liu, Ying; Lu, Yongfeng; Deheyn, Dimitri D.; Shawkey, Matthew D.; Blackledge, Todd A.

In: Nature communications, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2278, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsiung, BK, Siddique, RH, Stavenga, DG, Otto, JC, Allen, MC, Liu, Y, Lu, Y, Deheyn, DD, Shawkey, MD & Blackledge, TA 2017, 'Rainbow peacock spiders inspire miniature super-iridescent optics', Nature communications, vol. 8, no. 1, 2278. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-02451-x
Hsiung BK, Siddique RH, Stavenga DG, Otto JC, Allen MC, Liu Y et al. Rainbow peacock spiders inspire miniature super-iridescent optics. Nature communications. 2017 Dec 1;8(1). 2278. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-02451-x
Hsiung, Bor Kai ; Siddique, Radwanul Hasan ; Stavenga, Doekele G. ; Otto, Jürgen C. ; Allen, Michael C. ; Liu, Ying ; Lu, Yongfeng ; Deheyn, Dimitri D. ; Shawkey, Matthew D. ; Blackledge, Todd A. / Rainbow peacock spiders inspire miniature super-iridescent optics. In: Nature communications. 2017 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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