Race/ethnicity and intention to quit cigarette smoking

Julia N. Soulakova, Jinyu Li, Elizabeth J Crockett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study examined racial/ethnic differences in smokers' intentions to quit smoking within the next 6 months. The sample included 20,693 current non-occasional smokers in the U.S. who responded to the 2010–2011 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey. The rates of intention to quit within 1 month were significantly higher for non-Hispanic (NH) Black (21%; OR = 1.44, CI = 1.24–1.67) and Hispanic (21%; OR = 1.42, CI = 1.20–1.68) than for the NH Whites (NHW, 15%). The rates of intention to quit within 6 months were significantly higher for NH Blacks (46%; OR = 1.35, CI = 1.18–1.55) than for NH Whites (39%) and significantly lower for NH American Indians/Alaska Natives (38%; OR = 0.54, CI = 0.33–0.90) and NH Asians (39% OR = 0.55, CI = 0.35–0.86) than for NH multiracial (53%) smokers. Most disparities existed even after adjusting for smoking-related and sociodemographic factors. For most racial/ethnic groups, non-daily smoking and doctor's advice to quit were positively associated with the odds of intending to quit. For each racial/ethnic group, having a longer quit attempt in the past 12 months was positively associated with the odds of intending to quit. For NH Whites, NH Blacks, and Hispanics, the specific differences between racial/ethnic groups also depended on getting a doctor's advice, education, and survey mode. Although a smoker's intention to quit may not necessarily lead to immediate smoking cessation, the lack of intention may drastically delay smoking cessation. The study highlights the importance of accounting for racial/ethnic disparities when designing and implementing interventions to motivate smokers to quit and aid smoking cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-165
Number of pages6
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Smoking
Smoking Cessation
Ethnic Groups
Hispanic Americans
North American Indians
Tobacco Use
Education
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Population-based studies
  • Racial/ethnic differences
  • Smoking cessation in the United States
  • Smoking-related behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Race/ethnicity and intention to quit cigarette smoking. / Soulakova, Julia N.; Li, Jinyu; Crockett, Elizabeth J.

In: Preventive Medicine Reports, Vol. 5, 01.03.2017, p. 160-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soulakova, Julia N. ; Li, Jinyu ; Crockett, Elizabeth J. / Race/ethnicity and intention to quit cigarette smoking. In: Preventive Medicine Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 5. pp. 160-165.
@article{573308444d924e4885cc8eb07b736453,
title = "Race/ethnicity and intention to quit cigarette smoking",
abstract = "The study examined racial/ethnic differences in smokers' intentions to quit smoking within the next 6 months. The sample included 20,693 current non-occasional smokers in the U.S. who responded to the 2010–2011 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey. The rates of intention to quit within 1 month were significantly higher for non-Hispanic (NH) Black (21{\%}; OR = 1.44, CI = 1.24–1.67) and Hispanic (21{\%}; OR = 1.42, CI = 1.20–1.68) than for the NH Whites (NHW, 15{\%}). The rates of intention to quit within 6 months were significantly higher for NH Blacks (46{\%}; OR = 1.35, CI = 1.18–1.55) than for NH Whites (39{\%}) and significantly lower for NH American Indians/Alaska Natives (38{\%}; OR = 0.54, CI = 0.33–0.90) and NH Asians (39{\%} OR = 0.55, CI = 0.35–0.86) than for NH multiracial (53{\%}) smokers. Most disparities existed even after adjusting for smoking-related and sociodemographic factors. For most racial/ethnic groups, non-daily smoking and doctor's advice to quit were positively associated with the odds of intending to quit. For each racial/ethnic group, having a longer quit attempt in the past 12 months was positively associated with the odds of intending to quit. For NH Whites, NH Blacks, and Hispanics, the specific differences between racial/ethnic groups also depended on getting a doctor's advice, education, and survey mode. Although a smoker's intention to quit may not necessarily lead to immediate smoking cessation, the lack of intention may drastically delay smoking cessation. The study highlights the importance of accounting for racial/ethnic disparities when designing and implementing interventions to motivate smokers to quit and aid smoking cessation.",
keywords = "Population-based studies, Racial/ethnic differences, Smoking cessation in the United States, Smoking-related behaviors",
author = "Soulakova, {Julia N.} and Jinyu Li and Crockett, {Elizabeth J}",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.pmedr.2016.12.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "160--165",
journal = "Preventive Medicine Reports",
issn = "2211-3355",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Race/ethnicity and intention to quit cigarette smoking

AU - Soulakova, Julia N.

AU - Li, Jinyu

AU - Crockett, Elizabeth J

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - The study examined racial/ethnic differences in smokers' intentions to quit smoking within the next 6 months. The sample included 20,693 current non-occasional smokers in the U.S. who responded to the 2010–2011 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey. The rates of intention to quit within 1 month were significantly higher for non-Hispanic (NH) Black (21%; OR = 1.44, CI = 1.24–1.67) and Hispanic (21%; OR = 1.42, CI = 1.20–1.68) than for the NH Whites (NHW, 15%). The rates of intention to quit within 6 months were significantly higher for NH Blacks (46%; OR = 1.35, CI = 1.18–1.55) than for NH Whites (39%) and significantly lower for NH American Indians/Alaska Natives (38%; OR = 0.54, CI = 0.33–0.90) and NH Asians (39% OR = 0.55, CI = 0.35–0.86) than for NH multiracial (53%) smokers. Most disparities existed even after adjusting for smoking-related and sociodemographic factors. For most racial/ethnic groups, non-daily smoking and doctor's advice to quit were positively associated with the odds of intending to quit. For each racial/ethnic group, having a longer quit attempt in the past 12 months was positively associated with the odds of intending to quit. For NH Whites, NH Blacks, and Hispanics, the specific differences between racial/ethnic groups also depended on getting a doctor's advice, education, and survey mode. Although a smoker's intention to quit may not necessarily lead to immediate smoking cessation, the lack of intention may drastically delay smoking cessation. The study highlights the importance of accounting for racial/ethnic disparities when designing and implementing interventions to motivate smokers to quit and aid smoking cessation.

AB - The study examined racial/ethnic differences in smokers' intentions to quit smoking within the next 6 months. The sample included 20,693 current non-occasional smokers in the U.S. who responded to the 2010–2011 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey. The rates of intention to quit within 1 month were significantly higher for non-Hispanic (NH) Black (21%; OR = 1.44, CI = 1.24–1.67) and Hispanic (21%; OR = 1.42, CI = 1.20–1.68) than for the NH Whites (NHW, 15%). The rates of intention to quit within 6 months were significantly higher for NH Blacks (46%; OR = 1.35, CI = 1.18–1.55) than for NH Whites (39%) and significantly lower for NH American Indians/Alaska Natives (38%; OR = 0.54, CI = 0.33–0.90) and NH Asians (39% OR = 0.55, CI = 0.35–0.86) than for NH multiracial (53%) smokers. Most disparities existed even after adjusting for smoking-related and sociodemographic factors. For most racial/ethnic groups, non-daily smoking and doctor's advice to quit were positively associated with the odds of intending to quit. For each racial/ethnic group, having a longer quit attempt in the past 12 months was positively associated with the odds of intending to quit. For NH Whites, NH Blacks, and Hispanics, the specific differences between racial/ethnic groups also depended on getting a doctor's advice, education, and survey mode. Although a smoker's intention to quit may not necessarily lead to immediate smoking cessation, the lack of intention may drastically delay smoking cessation. The study highlights the importance of accounting for racial/ethnic disparities when designing and implementing interventions to motivate smokers to quit and aid smoking cessation.

KW - Population-based studies

KW - Racial/ethnic differences

KW - Smoking cessation in the United States

KW - Smoking-related behaviors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85007295888&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85007295888&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pmedr.2016.12.008

DO - 10.1016/j.pmedr.2016.12.008

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 160

EP - 165

JO - Preventive Medicine Reports

JF - Preventive Medicine Reports

SN - 2211-3355

ER -