Quantity of parental language in the home environments of hard-of-hearing 2-year-olds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Automated analyses of full-day recordings were used to determine whether young children who are hard-of-hearing (HH) received similar levels of exposure to adult words and conversational interactions as age-matched peers with normal-hearing (NH). Differences in adult input between children in this study and in a normative database were considered. Finally, factors were examined that may have contributed to individual differences in the input characteristics of families. Results indicated that the NH and HH groups were exposed to similar numbers of adult words and conversational turns. However, both the NH and HH groups were exposed to more adult words and engaged in more conversational turns than the NH children in the normative sample. Considering only the HH group, both quantity of adult words and conversational exchanges were correlated with children's auditory characteristics. Children's receptive language ability was correlated with conversational exchanges but not with adult word counts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)402-420
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Quantity of parental language in the home environments of hard-of-hearing 2-year-olds. / Vandam, Mark; Ambrose, Sophie E; Moeller, Mary Pat.

In: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.10.2012, p. 402-420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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