Quantifying soft tissue loss in facial aging: A study in women using magnetic resonance imaging

Ashley Wysong, Tim Joseph, David Kim, Jean Y. Tang, Hayes B. Gladstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Facial aging involves changes in the facial skeleton and soft tissues. There is limited quantitative data on soft tissue aging of the face. Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify and compare facial soft tissue loss over time. Methods and Materials Two thousand thirty-seven MRI scans from 58 women divided into young, middle-aged, and older groups were screened. A blinded radiologist used MRI to measure the temporal, infraorbital, and medial and lateral cheek areas. Results The mean thickness of the subcutaneous tissue in the temporal area was 12.3, 8.4, and 8.9 mm in the young, middle-aged, and older groups, respectively (p <.001). A mean difference of 1.6 mm was seen between the young and middle-aged groups and 2.2 mm between the young and older group (p <.001) in the infraorbital area, 3.3 mm between the young and middle-aged groups and 3.2 mm between the young and older group in the medial cheeks (p <.001), and 2.4 mm between the young and middle-aged groups and 2.4 mm between the young and older group in the lateral cheeks (p =.01). Conclusions Facial soft tissue undergoes significant deterioration over time, with the most dramatic changes between the ages of 30 and 60 in the temporal, infraorbital, and lateral and medial cheek areas. Soft tissue augmentation and volume correction in these areas may be an effective strategy for facial rejuvenation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1895-1902
Number of pages8
JournalDermatologic Surgery
Volume39
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

Fingerprint

Cheek
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Rejuvenation
Subcutaneous Tissue
Skeleton

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Quantifying soft tissue loss in facial aging : A study in women using magnetic resonance imaging. / Wysong, Ashley; Joseph, Tim; Kim, David; Tang, Jean Y.; Gladstone, Hayes B.

In: Dermatologic Surgery, Vol. 39, No. 12, 01.12.2013, p. 1895-1902.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wysong, Ashley ; Joseph, Tim ; Kim, David ; Tang, Jean Y. ; Gladstone, Hayes B. / Quantifying soft tissue loss in facial aging : A study in women using magnetic resonance imaging. In: Dermatologic Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 39, No. 12. pp. 1895-1902.
@article{c789da28929f4486b0560155140b5f90,
title = "Quantifying soft tissue loss in facial aging: A study in women using magnetic resonance imaging",
abstract = "Background Facial aging involves changes in the facial skeleton and soft tissues. There is limited quantitative data on soft tissue aging of the face. Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify and compare facial soft tissue loss over time. Methods and Materials Two thousand thirty-seven MRI scans from 58 women divided into young, middle-aged, and older groups were screened. A blinded radiologist used MRI to measure the temporal, infraorbital, and medial and lateral cheek areas. Results The mean thickness of the subcutaneous tissue in the temporal area was 12.3, 8.4, and 8.9 mm in the young, middle-aged, and older groups, respectively (p <.001). A mean difference of 1.6 mm was seen between the young and middle-aged groups and 2.2 mm between the young and older group (p <.001) in the infraorbital area, 3.3 mm between the young and middle-aged groups and 3.2 mm between the young and older group in the medial cheeks (p <.001), and 2.4 mm between the young and middle-aged groups and 2.4 mm between the young and older group in the lateral cheeks (p =.01). Conclusions Facial soft tissue undergoes significant deterioration over time, with the most dramatic changes between the ages of 30 and 60 in the temporal, infraorbital, and lateral and medial cheek areas. Soft tissue augmentation and volume correction in these areas may be an effective strategy for facial rejuvenation.",
author = "Ashley Wysong and Tim Joseph and David Kim and Tang, {Jean Y.} and Gladstone, {Hayes B.}",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/dsu.12362",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "1895--1902",
journal = "Dermatologic Surgery",
issn = "1076-0512",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quantifying soft tissue loss in facial aging

T2 - A study in women using magnetic resonance imaging

AU - Wysong, Ashley

AU - Joseph, Tim

AU - Kim, David

AU - Tang, Jean Y.

AU - Gladstone, Hayes B.

PY - 2013/12/1

Y1 - 2013/12/1

N2 - Background Facial aging involves changes in the facial skeleton and soft tissues. There is limited quantitative data on soft tissue aging of the face. Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify and compare facial soft tissue loss over time. Methods and Materials Two thousand thirty-seven MRI scans from 58 women divided into young, middle-aged, and older groups were screened. A blinded radiologist used MRI to measure the temporal, infraorbital, and medial and lateral cheek areas. Results The mean thickness of the subcutaneous tissue in the temporal area was 12.3, 8.4, and 8.9 mm in the young, middle-aged, and older groups, respectively (p <.001). A mean difference of 1.6 mm was seen between the young and middle-aged groups and 2.2 mm between the young and older group (p <.001) in the infraorbital area, 3.3 mm between the young and middle-aged groups and 3.2 mm between the young and older group in the medial cheeks (p <.001), and 2.4 mm between the young and middle-aged groups and 2.4 mm between the young and older group in the lateral cheeks (p =.01). Conclusions Facial soft tissue undergoes significant deterioration over time, with the most dramatic changes between the ages of 30 and 60 in the temporal, infraorbital, and lateral and medial cheek areas. Soft tissue augmentation and volume correction in these areas may be an effective strategy for facial rejuvenation.

AB - Background Facial aging involves changes in the facial skeleton and soft tissues. There is limited quantitative data on soft tissue aging of the face. Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify and compare facial soft tissue loss over time. Methods and Materials Two thousand thirty-seven MRI scans from 58 women divided into young, middle-aged, and older groups were screened. A blinded radiologist used MRI to measure the temporal, infraorbital, and medial and lateral cheek areas. Results The mean thickness of the subcutaneous tissue in the temporal area was 12.3, 8.4, and 8.9 mm in the young, middle-aged, and older groups, respectively (p <.001). A mean difference of 1.6 mm was seen between the young and middle-aged groups and 2.2 mm between the young and older group (p <.001) in the infraorbital area, 3.3 mm between the young and middle-aged groups and 3.2 mm between the young and older group in the medial cheeks (p <.001), and 2.4 mm between the young and middle-aged groups and 2.4 mm between the young and older group in the lateral cheeks (p =.01). Conclusions Facial soft tissue undergoes significant deterioration over time, with the most dramatic changes between the ages of 30 and 60 in the temporal, infraorbital, and lateral and medial cheek areas. Soft tissue augmentation and volume correction in these areas may be an effective strategy for facial rejuvenation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84889589884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84889589884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/dsu.12362

DO - 10.1111/dsu.12362

M3 - Article

C2 - 24238002

AN - SCOPUS:84889589884

VL - 39

SP - 1895

EP - 1902

JO - Dermatologic Surgery

JF - Dermatologic Surgery

SN - 1076-0512

IS - 12

ER -