Quality of life across medical conditions and psychological factors: implications for population health management

Amy M. Williams, Pamela E. May, Shawn T. Mason, Chun Wang, Lidia Pomana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To identify the contributions of medical conditions and psychological distress to well-being within a non-clinical sample, stratified by age. It was predicted that medical conditions and psychological distress would be negatively associated with well-being. It was also predicted that psychological distress and medical conditions would account for significant variance in well-being. It was further predicted that psychological distress would mediate the relationship between medical conditions and well-being across the life span. Methods: 1,424,307 employees/health plan members that completed an HRA. SEM was used to characterize relationships among medical conditions and psychological distress in predicting well-being (QoL, HRQoL, and impairments in ADLs) in five adult age groups. Results: Medical conditions and psychological distress were negatively associated with well-being. As age increased, psychological distress was less associated with well-being. However, in those >75 years old, psychological distress had the largest association with well-being. All medical conditions, except cancer, were negatively associated with well-being. There were decreasing effects of medical conditions across the life span, with the exception of pulmonary disease which increased. Psychological distress mediated the relationship between medical conditions and well-being, with chronic pain having the greatest mediation across the life span. Conclusions: The analysis revealed differences in the contribution of psychological distress and medical conditions to well-being by age group. Additionally, the contribution of psychological distress was equitable to that of medical conditions, thus highlighting the importance of addressing psychological distress in medical populations for well-being. Findings suggest the relevance of age in well-being and the need for further longitudinal investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1475-1485
Number of pages11
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Quality of Life
Psychology
Health
Population
Age Groups
Occupational Health
Activities of Daily Living
Chronic Pain
Lung Diseases

Keywords

  • Age
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Medical conditions
  • Psychological distress
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Quality of life across medical conditions and psychological factors : implications for population health management. / Williams, Amy M.; May, Pamela E.; Mason, Shawn T.; Wang, Chun; Pomana, Lidia.

In: Quality of Life Research, Vol. 25, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 1475-1485.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, Amy M. ; May, Pamela E. ; Mason, Shawn T. ; Wang, Chun ; Pomana, Lidia. / Quality of life across medical conditions and psychological factors : implications for population health management. In: Quality of Life Research. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 6. pp. 1475-1485.
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