QA/QC software to mitigate mold and other Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) hazards in construction

Kevin R Grosskopf, Bilge Celik, Chuan Song, Paul Oppenheim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Mold has become a major issue for the construction industry due to potential health hazards, the increasing incidence of large-sum and highly publicized litigation, negative effects on public relations, and a tightening insurance market. In many areas of the U.S. with abundant rainfall and consistent rates of new construction, mold is fast becoming the successor to asbestos in health-related construction claims. The cohabitation of pathogenic mycobacteria with mold may present additional health risks to both building occupants and construction workers. In response, the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) and the University of Florida developed a computer-based Moisture Control Construction Checklist (MC3) that will enable builders to quickly identify mold-forming conditions during construction, to prevent the introduction of moisture into building materials and assemblies, and to mitigate mold growth following exposure. A demonstration version of MC3 has been developed to generate checklists and training materials specific to project location and building type. A December 2005 survey of MC3 industry test sites gave the software an overall performance rating of 7.7 on a scale of 1 to 10. Further research found that 7 of 8 contractors would be willing to pay $250 or more per subscription. At 5% market penetration, MC3 could train more than 7,000 workers and generate more than $400,000 in self-sustaining revenue from AGC membership alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-50
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Construction Education and Research
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Air quality
Hazards
air
Contractors
Moisture control
Public relations
worker
Health hazards
Asbestos
construction industry
Health risks
cohabitation
subscription
market
Insurance
Construction industry
health risk
Fungi
health
insurance

Keywords

  • Checklist
  • Construction
  • Mold
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Building and Construction
  • Education

Cite this

QA/QC software to mitigate mold and other Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) hazards in construction. / Grosskopf, Kevin R; Celik, Bilge; Song, Chuan; Oppenheim, Paul.

In: International Journal of Construction Education and Research, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 35-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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