PTM Tracker: A system for determining trends of PTM modification sites relative to protein domains

Oliver Bonham-Carter, Dhundy R. Bastola

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Post-translational modifications (PTMs) increase protein functional diversity by modifying an amino acid at specific locations called modification sites (MSs) in protein. It is believed that domains are being influenced by PTMs at interacting MSs to determine the unique functional changes in protein and, in this scenario, it is likely that the exact position of the MS, relative to the domain, plays a major part in structural changes by PTM influence. In this study, we present a system called 'PTM Tracker', built from two main parts to study the general distances of MS amino acids which are relative to protein functional domains. In the first part, we apply our system to illustrate that unique organisms appear to have distinguishing locations where PTMs may be found in the proteome. These crowded locations of MS sites (called, 'neighbourhoods') are relative to protein domains. We describe how these MS neighbourhoods may be a conserved extension of the already-conserved domain. Since specific protein domain types may be found in diverse proteins, the second part of our system studies MS neighbourhood clusters, relative to user-selected domains. From the study of many different proteins containing the same domain type, we conclude trends to suggest that MS neighbourhoods have specific locations in protein, relative to the domains (where-ever the domain occurs naturally), with which they are likely to interact. We conclude that the study of these distances may help to understand interaction mechanisms and describe types of protein folding requirements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2016 IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology, EIT 2016
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages482-487
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781467399852
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 5 2016
Event2016 IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology, EIT 2016 - Grand Forks, United States
Duration: May 19 2016May 21 2016

Publication series

NameIEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology
Volume2016-August
ISSN (Print)2154-0357
ISSN (Electronic)2154-0373

Other

Other2016 IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology, EIT 2016
CountryUnited States
CityGrand Forks
Period5/19/165/21/16

Fingerprint

Proteins
Amino acids
Protein folding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Information Systems
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Bonham-Carter, O., & Bastola, D. R. (2016). PTM Tracker: A system for determining trends of PTM modification sites relative to protein domains. In 2016 IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology, EIT 2016 (pp. 482-487). [7535288] (IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology; Vol. 2016-August). IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/EIT.2016.7535288

PTM Tracker : A system for determining trends of PTM modification sites relative to protein domains. / Bonham-Carter, Oliver; Bastola, Dhundy R.

2016 IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology, EIT 2016. IEEE Computer Society, 2016. p. 482-487 7535288 (IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology; Vol. 2016-August).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bonham-Carter, O & Bastola, DR 2016, PTM Tracker: A system for determining trends of PTM modification sites relative to protein domains. in 2016 IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology, EIT 2016., 7535288, IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology, vol. 2016-August, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 482-487, 2016 IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology, EIT 2016, Grand Forks, United States, 5/19/16. https://doi.org/10.1109/EIT.2016.7535288
Bonham-Carter O, Bastola DR. PTM Tracker: A system for determining trends of PTM modification sites relative to protein domains. In 2016 IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology, EIT 2016. IEEE Computer Society. 2016. p. 482-487. 7535288. (IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology). https://doi.org/10.1109/EIT.2016.7535288
Bonham-Carter, Oliver ; Bastola, Dhundy R. / PTM Tracker : A system for determining trends of PTM modification sites relative to protein domains. 2016 IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology, EIT 2016. IEEE Computer Society, 2016. pp. 482-487 (IEEE International Conference on Electro Information Technology).
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