Psychotropic usage by patients presenting to an academic eating disorders program

Karuna Mizusaki, Daniel E Gih, Christina LaRosa, Rebekah Richmond, Renee D. Rienecke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess psychotropic use patterns and possible associations with age, eating disorder diagnosis and psychiatric comorbidity in adolescents and young adults with a primary eating disorder. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 86 consecutive patients with a primary eating disorder from August 2012 to December 2014 was conducted. Patients presented for a multidisciplinary evaluation at a United States-based academic program for eating disorders. Results: Nearly half (45.3%) of the patients reported being on a psychotropic medication. Antidepressants were the most reported category, prescribed in 38.4% of the patients evaluated. There was a significant association between the type of eating disorder and the number of psychotropics prescribed. Patients with a diagnosis of other specified feeding or eating disorder reported more prescriptions upon presentation than patients with anorexia nervosa. Despite the finding that a significant minority of patients had a psychiatric comorbidity, this did not appear to increase the likelihood of psychotropic usage over those diagnosed with an eating disorder alone. In addition, patients with a longer duration of illness and patients with a history of non-suicidal self-injury were more likely to present to treatment on psychotropic medications. Conclusions: Psychotropic medications appear to be commonly prescribed among individuals evaluated in a tertiary care center for an eating disorder. Given that psychotropics are not recommended as the primary intervention for eating disorders, the frequency may be indicative of practitioners not following research-informed practice guidelines. The differences observed may also reflect complexities related to clinical features or illness history. Level of evidence: Level V: Descriptive study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)769-774
Number of pages6
JournalEating and Weight Disorders
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Fingerprint

Comorbidity
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Anorexia Nervosa
Practice Guidelines
Tertiary Care Centers
Mental Disorders
Antidepressive Agents
Prescriptions
Psychiatry
Young Adult
History
Wounds and Injuries
Research
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Eating disorders
  • Medication
  • Psychotropic usage
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Psychotropic usage by patients presenting to an academic eating disorders program. / Mizusaki, Karuna; Gih, Daniel E; LaRosa, Christina; Richmond, Rebekah; Rienecke, Renee D.

In: Eating and Weight Disorders, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.12.2018, p. 769-774.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mizusaki, Karuna ; Gih, Daniel E ; LaRosa, Christina ; Richmond, Rebekah ; Rienecke, Renee D. / Psychotropic usage by patients presenting to an academic eating disorders program. In: Eating and Weight Disorders. 2018 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 769-774.
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