Psychosocial correlates in bullying and victimization: The relationship between depression, anxiety, and bully/victim status

Susan S Swearer, Samuel Y. Song, Paulette Tam Cary, John W. Eagle, William T. Mickelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Examined differences between bullies, victims, and bully-victims on internalizing psychopathology (depression and anxiety). Participants included 133 (66 male and 67 female) sixth-grade students from a Midwestern middle school, ages ranging from 11 to 13 years old. The data presented are from the first two years of a five-year longitudinal study that began January of 1999. Initial results indicate differences between bullies, victims, bully-victims, and students without bully/victim problems (no status) in terms of depression and anxiety. Specifically, bully-victims and bullies were more likely to be depressed than victims and no status students. Bully-victims and victims were more likely to experience anxious symptoms than bullies and no status students. Thus, an interesting pattern emerged with respect to internalizing psychopathology along the bully/victim continuum. Bully-victims may be the most impaired subtype with respect to depression and anxiety. Implications for prevention and intervention programs are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-121
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Emotional Abuse
Volume2
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001

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Bullying
Crime Victims
Anxiety
Depression
Students
Psychopathology
Longitudinal Studies

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Bullying
  • Depression
  • Early adolescence
  • Victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Psychosocial correlates in bullying and victimization : The relationship between depression, anxiety, and bully/victim status. / Swearer, Susan S; Song, Samuel Y.; Cary, Paulette Tam; Eagle, John W.; Mickelson, William T.

In: Journal of Emotional Abuse, Vol. 2, No. 2-3, 01.12.2001, p. 95-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Swearer, Susan S ; Song, Samuel Y. ; Cary, Paulette Tam ; Eagle, John W. ; Mickelson, William T. / Psychosocial correlates in bullying and victimization : The relationship between depression, anxiety, and bully/victim status. In: Journal of Emotional Abuse. 2001 ; Vol. 2, No. 2-3. pp. 95-121.
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