Psychosocial and functional contributors to personal recovery in serious mental illness

Emily B.H. Treichler, Feiyu Li, Mary O’Hare, Eric A. Evans, J. R. Johnson, William D Spaulding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Although recovery-oriented services have been conceptualized to improve personal recovery, related research often focuses on measures of clinical recovery. Identifying the relationships between personal recovery, clinical recovery, and psychosocial variables will inform service components and outcome measurement in recovery-oriented services. Aims: This study sought to determine the connection between personal recovery and two sets of potential contributors: psychosocial variables (i.e., empowerment, resilience, and consumer involvement) and functional indicators of clinical recovery. Method: These relationships were examined by analyzing survey data collected from 266 consumers who are receiving public mental health services in the United States. Results: Empowerment, resilience and psychological involvement were associated with personal recovery. Clinical recovery did not uniquely contribute to personal recovery once psychosocial factors were accounted for. Interactions revealed that the relationship between psychological involvement and personal recovery was stronger for those who had been recently hospitalized, and for those with relatively greater resilience. Conclusions: Results indicate that personal recovery is an essential outcome measure for recovery-oriented services that cannot be replaced by clinical recovery outcome measurement. Additionally, empowerment, resilience, and consumer involvement are key components of recovery, which suggests that services and outcome measures should prioritize incorporation of these constructs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Mental Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Psychological Resilience
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Psychology
United States Public Health Service
Mental Health Services
Research
Power (Psychology)
Community Participation
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • empowerment
  • functioning
  • outcome measurement
  • personal recovery
  • resilience
  • Serious mental illness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Psychosocial and functional contributors to personal recovery in serious mental illness. / Treichler, Emily B.H.; Li, Feiyu; O’Hare, Mary; Evans, Eric A.; Johnson, J. R.; Spaulding, William D.

In: Journal of Mental Health, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Treichler, Emily B.H. ; Li, Feiyu ; O’Hare, Mary ; Evans, Eric A. ; Johnson, J. R. ; Spaulding, William D. / Psychosocial and functional contributors to personal recovery in serious mental illness. In: Journal of Mental Health. 2018.
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