Psychopharmacological intervention. II: Teacher perceptions of psychotropic medication for students with learning disabilities.

M. H. Epstein, N. N. Singh, J. Luebke, C. E. Stout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The perceptions, knowledge, and opinions of 104 teachers of students with learning disabilities regarding medication used with their students were investigated. The students' doctors were perceived as the professionals primarily responsible for making the decision to have the student either placed on or taken off medication. The teachers indicated that global impressions and direct behavioral observations were used to assess the effects of medication but that they would prefer to use behavioral observations and rating scales. Hyperactivity and delusions/hallucinations were perceived as the problems most likely to lead to medication. Less than 15% of the teachers indicated that their professional preservice training had provided them with sufficient information on the use of medication for children with behavior problems, and less than 20% had a similar opinion regarding their inservice training on the same topic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-483
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of learning disabilities
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1991

Fingerprint

Learning Disorders
learning disability
medication
Students
teacher
student
Inservice Training
Delusions
Hallucinations
Child Behavior
delusion
Decision Making
rating scale
Behavior Observation Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Psychopharmacological intervention. II : Teacher perceptions of psychotropic medication for students with learning disabilities. / Epstein, M. H.; Singh, N. N.; Luebke, J.; Stout, C. E.

In: Journal of learning disabilities, Vol. 24, No. 8, 10.1991, p. 477-483.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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