Psychological variables and cancer pain

Lani M Zimmerman, Kristine Turner Story, Fannie Gaston-Johansson, Joanne R. Rowles

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pain can cause both physical and psychological distress that has a negative impact on a patient's quality of life. The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine whether cancer patients (N = 60) with pain (n = 30) had higher scores of depression, anxiety, somatization, and hostility than did cancer patients without pain (n = 30). The study was conducted in a midwestern medical center hospital during a 9-month period. Psychological variables were measured using subscales of the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Patients who reported pain completed the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and Visual Analogue Scale. Significant positive correlations were found between total MPQ scores and all four subscales of the BSI (r = 0.60-0.78, p < 0.05). Patients with pain scored higher on all four subscales of the BSI, with significant differences occurring in somatization (t = 2.05, p < 0.05) and hostility (t = 1.93, p < 0.05). The findings suggest a relationship between pain intensity and psychological status. Nursing interventions aimed at reducing these factors may help to decrease the pain, in addition to then decreasing the psychological distress experienced by patients with cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-53
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Nursing
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 27 1996

Fingerprint

Psychology
Pain
Hostility
Pain Measurement
Equipment and Supplies
Neoplasms
Cancer Pain
Visual Analog Scale
Nursing
Anxiety
Quality of Life
Depression

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • cancer pain
  • depression
  • hostility
  • somatization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Zimmerman, L. M., Story, K. T., Gaston-Johansson, F., & Rowles, J. R. (1996). Psychological variables and cancer pain. Cancer Nursing, 19(1), 44-53. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002820-199602000-00006

Psychological variables and cancer pain. / Zimmerman, Lani M; Story, Kristine Turner; Gaston-Johansson, Fannie; Rowles, Joanne R.

In: Cancer Nursing, Vol. 19, No. 1, 27.02.1996, p. 44-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Zimmerman, LM, Story, KT, Gaston-Johansson, F & Rowles, JR 1996, 'Psychological variables and cancer pain', Cancer Nursing, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 44-53. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002820-199602000-00006
Zimmerman, Lani M ; Story, Kristine Turner ; Gaston-Johansson, Fannie ; Rowles, Joanne R. / Psychological variables and cancer pain. In: Cancer Nursing. 1996 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 44-53.
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