Psychological Distress and Size of Place

The Epidemiology of Rural Economic Stress

Danny R Hoyt, David O'Donnell, Kristin Yagla Mack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract Size‐of‐place differences in the distribution of psychological distress are examined. Residents in communities of less than 2,500 population are predicted to have higher levels of distress than persons living in farm, rural nonfarm, and larger places. A research instrument was designed to measure economic stress, personal resources, and psychological distress in a survey of adult householders in a midwestern state. Results support the interpretation that long‐term demographic and social trends had a negative impact upon the psychological well‐being of residents in rural communities. Residents of these rural communities have higher levels of distress than persons living on farms or in towns of up to 9,999 population. Levels of psychological distress are not significantly different between persons living in rural communities and those in small cities or urban centers. 1995 Rural Sociological Society

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)707-720
Number of pages14
JournalRural Sociology
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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epidemiology
rural community
resident
human being
farm
economics
town
interpretation
trend
resources
community

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Psychological Distress and Size of Place : The Epidemiology of Rural Economic Stress. / Hoyt, Danny R; O'Donnell, David; Mack, Kristin Yagla.

In: Rural Sociology, Vol. 60, No. 4, 01.01.1995, p. 707-720.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoyt, Danny R ; O'Donnell, David ; Mack, Kristin Yagla. / Psychological Distress and Size of Place : The Epidemiology of Rural Economic Stress. In: Rural Sociology. 1995 ; Vol. 60, No. 4. pp. 707-720.
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