Pseudomonas siderophore pyochelin enhances neutrophil-mediated endothelial cell injury

B. E. Britigan, G. T. Rasmussen, C. D. Cox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pyochelin, a siderophore secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, binds iron in a form which can catalyze the formation of hydroxyl radical (·OH) from neutrophil-derived superoxide (O 2 / - ·) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Ferripyochelin induced a concentration-dependent increase in endothelial cell injury ( 51 Cr release) resulting from exposure to H 2 O 2 , a xanthine/xanthine oxidase O 2 / - ·/H 2 O 2 generating system, or stimulated neutrophils. This process was dependent on the presence of iron. Formation of ·OH was confirmed using spin trapping. Although a slight (13%) increase in neutrophil O 2 / - · production in the presence of ferripyochelin was observed, this did not appear to account for the extent of endothelial cell injury observed. The antioxidants dimethylthiourea and catalase decreased endothelial cell injury, whereas dimethyl sulfoxide and superoxide dismutase were without effect. Fe-nitrilotriacetic acid and Fe-EDTA, which are also ·OH catalysts, did not augment endothelial cell injury resulting from exposure to the above oxidant systems. In contrast to results with the endothelial cells, killing of P. aeruginosa by O 2 / - ·/H 2 O 2 derived from the reaction of xanthine and xanthine oxidase was not increased by ferripyochelin. These data are consistent with the possibility that the interaction of Pseudomonas- and phagocyte-derived secretory products could contribute to local tissue injury at sites of P. aeruginosa infection by causing the generation of ·OH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)L192-L198
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Volume266
Issue number2 10-2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Fingerprint

Siderophores
Pseudomonas
Neutrophils
Endothelial Cells
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Wounds and Injuries
Xanthine
Xanthine Oxidase
Iron
Nitrilotriacetic Acid
Spin Trapping
Pseudomonas Infections
Phagocytes
Dimethyl Sulfoxide
Oxidants
Edetic Acid
Superoxides
Hydroxyl Radical
Catalase
Hydrogen Peroxide

Keywords

  • hydrogen peroxide
  • hydroxyl radical
  • iron
  • lung injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Pseudomonas siderophore pyochelin enhances neutrophil-mediated endothelial cell injury. / Britigan, B. E.; Rasmussen, G. T.; Cox, C. D.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Vol. 266, No. 2 10-2, 01.01.1994, p. L192-L198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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