Proteomic analysis of mesenchymal to Schwann cell transdifferentiation

Anup D. Sharma, Jayme Wiederin, Metin Uz, Pawel S Ciborowski, Surya K. Mallapragada, Howard Eliot Gendelman, Donald S. Sakaguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While transplantation of Schwann cells facilitates axon regeneration, remyelination and repair after peripheral nerve injury clinical use is limited by cell bioavailability. We posit that such limitation in cell access can be overcome by the use of autologous bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). As MSCs can transdifferentiate to Schwann cell-phenotypes and accelerate nerve regeneration we undertook proteomic evaluation of the cells to uncover the protein contents that affects Schwann cell formulation. Transdifferentiated MSCs secrete significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in cell-conditioned media that facilitated neurite outgrowth. MSC proteins significantly regulated during Schwann cell transdifferentiation included, but were not limited to, GNAI2, MYL9, ACTN4, ACTN1, ACTB, CAV-1, HSPB1, PHB2, TBB4B, CTGF, TGFI1, ARF6, EZR, GELS, VIM, WNT5A, RTN4, EFNB1. These support axonal guidance, myelination, neural development and neural growth and differentiation. The results unravel the molecular events that underlie cell transdifferentiation that ultimately serve to facilitate nerve regeneration and repair in support of cell transplantation. Significance statement While Schwann cells facilitate axon regeneration, remyelination and repair after peripheral nerve injury clinical use is limited by cell bioavailability. We posit that such limitation in cell access can be overcome by the use of bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transdifferentiated to Schwann cell-phenotypes. In the present study, we undertook the first proteomic evaluation of these transdifferentiated cells to uncover the protein contents that affects Schwann cell formulation. Furthermore, these transdifferentiated MSCs secrete significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in cell-conditioned media that facilitated neurite outgrowth. Our results demonstrate that a number of MSC proteins were significantly regulated following transdifferentiation of the MSCs supporting roles in axonal guidance, myelination, neural development and differentiation. The conclusions of the present work unravel the molecular events that underlie cell transdifferentiation that ultimately serve to facilitate nerve regeneration and repair in support of cell transplantation. Our study was the first proteomic comparison demonstrating the transdifferentiation of MSCs and these reported results can affect a wide field of stem cell biology, tissue engineering, and proteomics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-101
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Proteomics
Volume165
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2017

Fingerprint

Cell Transdifferentiation
Schwann Cells
Stem cells
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Proteomics
Cells
Nerve Regeneration
Repair
Peripheral Nerve Injuries
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Cell Transplantation
Nerve Growth Factor
Conditioned Culture Medium
Biological Availability
Axons
Regeneration
Proteins
Bone Marrow
Bone
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Axon regeneration
  • Brain-derived neurotrophic factor
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Nerve growth factor
  • Neurite outgrowth
  • Peripheral nerve regeneration
  • Proteomics
  • Remyelination
  • Schwann cells
  • Systems biology
  • Transdifferentiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Proteomic analysis of mesenchymal to Schwann cell transdifferentiation. / Sharma, Anup D.; Wiederin, Jayme; Uz, Metin; Ciborowski, Pawel S; Mallapragada, Surya K.; Gendelman, Howard Eliot; Sakaguchi, Donald S.

In: Journal of Proteomics, Vol. 165, 08.08.2017, p. 93-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharma, Anup D. ; Wiederin, Jayme ; Uz, Metin ; Ciborowski, Pawel S ; Mallapragada, Surya K. ; Gendelman, Howard Eliot ; Sakaguchi, Donald S. / Proteomic analysis of mesenchymal to Schwann cell transdifferentiation. In: Journal of Proteomics. 2017 ; Vol. 165. pp. 93-101.
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KW - Proteomics

KW - Remyelination

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KW - Systems biology

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