Prospective comparison of brush cytology, viral culture, and histology for the diagnosis of ulcerative esophagitis in AIDS

C. Mel Wilcox, William Rodgers, Audrey J Lazenby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background & Aims: The best method(s) for the diagnosis of esophageal ulcers in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is unknown. Methods: Over an 8-year period, all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with a CD4 lymphocyte count of ≤250/mm3 and an esophageal ulcer underwent a standard protocol consisting of 2 biopsy examinations for viral culture (shell vial technique), brushing for cytology with immunohistochemistry (IHC) for viral antigens, and 10 biopsy examinations of the ulcer base/edge for routine histology and IHC. The cause of ulcer was based on histologic findings and clinical and endoscopic follow-up evaluation after therapy. Results: Forty patients with 48 episodes of ulcer were studied (mean age, 34 yr; 88% men; median CD4 lymphocyte count = 31 cells/mm3; range, 0-250 cells/mm3). Six patients had more than one endoscopic examination documenting ulcer, and 2 patients had more than one cause of ulcer. The most common causes of ulcer were: idiopathic (IEU) 22, cytomegalovirus (CMV) 15, and gastroesophageal reflux disease 6. Viral culture was positive for herpes simplex in 3 of 3, but only 4 of 15 (27%) for CMV, and specificity of viral culture was 100%. Cytologic brushings were only positive in the patients with herpes simplex virus (HSV) or incidental Candida esophagitis. Viral cytopathic effect was apparent on routine histologic staining in each patient with viral esophagitis, and IHC confirmed the diagnosis in each patient. Follow-up evaluation disclosed no patient with a misdiagnosis based on histology. Conclusions: Viral culture and cytologic brushings add little to the evaluation of esophageal ulcers in patients with AIDS over multiple biopsy specimens with routine histology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)564-567
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume2
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2004

Fingerprint

Esophagitis
Cell Biology
Histology
Ulcer
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Immunohistochemistry
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Cytomegalovirus
Biopsy
Viral Cytopathogenic Effect
Herpes Simplex
Viral Antigens
Simplexvirus
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Diagnostic Errors
Candida
HIV
Staining and Labeling

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • CMV
  • HIV
  • HSV
  • IEU
  • IHC
  • acquired immune deficiency syndrome
  • cytomegalovirus
  • herpes simplex virus
  • human immunodeficiency virus
  • idiopathic esophagus ulcers
  • immunohistochemical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Prospective comparison of brush cytology, viral culture, and histology for the diagnosis of ulcerative esophagitis in AIDS. / Wilcox, C. Mel; Rodgers, William; Lazenby, Audrey J.

In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 2, No. 7, 01.07.2004, p. 564-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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