Promoting lifestyle self-awareness among the medical team by the use of an integrated teaching approach

A primary care experience

Eran Ben-Arye, Adva Lear, Doron Hermoni, Ruth N Margalit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Healthy lifestyle is recommended in clinical guidelines for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Research previously identified a gap between lifestyle recommendations and their implementation in clinical practice. In this paper, we describe a pilot educational program aimed to promote providers' awareness of their own lifestyles, and to explore whether increased personal awareness enhances providers' willingness to engage in lifestyle-change discussion with patients. Methods: Two primary-care urban clinics in Northern Israel participated in the program, which consisted of a series of six biweekly educational sessions, each lasting 2-4 hours. Each session included both knowledge-based and experiential learning based on complementary medicine modalities. Surveys at the end of the program and a year later provided the program evaluation. Results: Thirty-five personnel participated in the program. Thirteen (13) of the 20 participants (65%) reported an attitude change regarding eating habits after the program. At 1-year follow up, 24 of the 27 respondents (89%) stated that they were more aware of their eating habits and of their physical activity compared with precourse status. Twenty-three (23) of 27 respondents (85%) stated that after the program they were better prepared to initiate a conversation with their patients about lifestyle change. Conclusions: An integrated educational approach based on knowledge-based and complementary and alternative medicine experiential modalities, aimed to facilitate self-awareness, may enhance learners' attitude change. The findings demonstrate readiness of learners to reexamine their lifestyles. Increased self-awareness helped participants to make a positive attitude change regarding eating habits and physical activity and was associated with participants' increased engagement in lifestyle-change discussions with patients. The teaching approach had longstanding effect, noted in the one-year follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-469
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

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Life Style
Primary Health Care
Teaching
Feeding Behavior
Complementary Therapies
Exercise
Problem-Based Learning
Program Evaluation
Israel
Chronic Disease
Cardiovascular Diseases
Guidelines
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Promoting lifestyle self-awareness among the medical team by the use of an integrated teaching approach : A primary care experience. / Ben-Arye, Eran; Lear, Adva; Hermoni, Doron; Margalit, Ruth N.

In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.05.2007, p. 461-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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