Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis presenting with an intracranial bleed and mimicking abusive head trauma

Suzanne Haney, James Harper, Edward Truemper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Abusive head trauma is a serious, often fatal condition; early identification is important to prevent repeat episodes and/or injuries to siblings. This case emphasizes the importance of a thorough workup in cases of suspected abusive head trauma. Case Presentation: A 4-month-old infant was found to have a severe subdural hematoma requiring surgical evacuation. Initially, abusive head trauma was considered as a diagnosis. Testing revealed vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) despite prophylactic vitamin K administration at birth. The infant eventually was diagnosed with progressive familial Iintrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2). Discussion: Although VKDB is a known cause of infantile intracranial hemorrhage, PFIC has not been previously reported to cause severe VKDB resulting in an intracranial hemorrhage. Conclusion: Our case illustrates the importance of a comprehensive systematic approach to investigate causes other than abusive head injury when intracranial bleeding is a significant finding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-48
Number of pages2
JournalWisconsin Medical Journal
Volume118
Issue number1
StatePublished - Apr 2019

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Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding
Craniocerebral Trauma
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Subdural Hematoma
Vitamin K
Cholestasis
Siblings
Parturition
Hemorrhage
Progressive familial intrahepatic 1 Cholestasis
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis presenting with an intracranial bleed and mimicking abusive head trauma. / Haney, Suzanne; Harper, James; Truemper, Edward.

In: Wisconsin Medical Journal, Vol. 118, No. 1, 04.2019, p. 47-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haney, Suzanne ; Harper, James ; Truemper, Edward. / Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis presenting with an intracranial bleed and mimicking abusive head trauma. In: Wisconsin Medical Journal. 2019 ; Vol. 118, No. 1. pp. 47-48.
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