Professionals' perceptions of psychotropic medication in residential facilities for individuals with mental retardation

N. N. Singh, C. R. Ellis, L. S. Donatelli, D. E. Williams, R. W. Ricketts, A. B. Goza, N. Perlman, D. E. Everly, A. M. Best, Y. N. Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Professional staff in four state facilities for individuals with mental retardation were surveyed to determine their perceptions, knowledge and opinions regarding the use of psychotropic medication. A large majority of the 377 respondents indicated that the physicians in their facilities were primarily responsible for medication-related decisions. Under ideal conditions, however, all professional staff and parents were seen as having a greater influence in the decision-making process. Aggression, delusions and hallucinations, self-injury, other psychiatric disorders, and anxiety were rated as disorders most likely to result in medication therapy. Behaviour modification was viewed as a suitable alternative to drug treatment for acting out and aggression. The professionals indicated that behavioural observation was the most influential assessment technique in current usage, followed by global impressions and informal diaries. Over 80% of the respondents perceived their preservice and inservice training on issues related to the use of psychotropic medication to treat behaviour problems as inadequate, with 96% of them desiring continuing education. These findings were compared to data from similar studies of populations with other disabilities, and suggestions for modifications in the current decision-making processes related to the use of psychotropic medication in institutionalized individuals with mental retardation are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1996

Fingerprint

Residential Facilities
Aggression
Intellectual Disability
Decision Making
medication
Acting Out
Inservice Training
Delusions
Behavior Therapy
Hallucinations
Continuing Education
Anxiety Disorders
Psychiatry
Parents
decision-making process
aggression
Physicians
Wounds and Injuries
staff
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Mental retardation
  • Pharmacotherapy
  • Professionals
  • Psychotropic medication
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Professionals' perceptions of psychotropic medication in residential facilities for individuals with mental retardation. / Singh, N. N.; Ellis, C. R.; Donatelli, L. S.; Williams, D. E.; Ricketts, R. W.; Goza, A. B.; Perlman, N.; Everly, D. E.; Best, A. M.; Singh, Y. N.

In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol. 40, No. 1, 02.1996, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singh, N. N. ; Ellis, C. R. ; Donatelli, L. S. ; Williams, D. E. ; Ricketts, R. W. ; Goza, A. B. ; Perlman, N. ; Everly, D. E. ; Best, A. M. ; Singh, Y. N. / Professionals' perceptions of psychotropic medication in residential facilities for individuals with mental retardation. In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research. 1996 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 1-7.
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