Professional development to support parent engagement

A case study of early childhood practitioners

Jill R. Brown, Lisa L Knoche, Carolyn P. Edwards, Susan M Sheridan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research Findings: This qualitative case study describes early childhood practitioners' (ECPs) perspectives on their professional development as part of a large federally funded school readiness intervention project as they experienced the processes of professional growth and change in learning skills related to promoting parental engagement in children's learning and development. A total of 28 ECPs participated in this study over 2 assessment periods across 2 academic years; 12 ECPs were interviewed twice, for a total of 40 interviews conducted and analyzed. Practitioners worked within the context of Early Head Start, Head Start, and Student Parent Programs in local high schools, all located in a midwestern state. The study intended to (a) discover practitioners' understanding of a parent engagement intervention, including their perspectives on the professional development and supports received; (b) assess how the parent engagement intervention was experienced by ECPs; and (c) discern how self-reported attitudes and behaviors of practitioners toward work with families changed as a function of the professional supports they received. Qualitative analyses of interview transcripts revealed 3 primary themes contributing to ECPs' experience with and understanding of the professional development model to support parent engagement: Self-Perceived Changes in Confidence and Competence in Enhancing Parental Engagement, Relationships as Supports for Change, and Practice: Time Pressure and Paperwork Woes. Practice or Policy: Lessons learned and implications for the implementation of future professional development models are provided. Findings inform other early childhood professional development efforts being implemented in the context of rigorous, research-based programming, particularly those intending to support parent engagement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)482-506
Number of pages25
JournalEarly Education and Development
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

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parents
childhood
Learning
Interviews
Child Development
Research
Mental Competency
development model
Students
Growth
school readiness
interview
learning
programming
confidence
school
experience
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Professional development to support parent engagement : A case study of early childhood practitioners. / Brown, Jill R.; Knoche, Lisa L; Edwards, Carolyn P.; Sheridan, Susan M.

In: Early Education and Development, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.05.2009, p. 482-506.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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