Problem-solving training with a multiply distressed abusive and neglectful mother: Effects on social insularity, negative affect, and stress

Virginia M. MacMillan, David C. Guevreniont, David J. Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multiple sources of stress and deficient problem-solving skills have been identified among maltreating parents. In the present study, a problem-solving intervention was evaluated with a multiply distressed, abusive and neglectful mother. Problem-solving skills were trained sequentially in a multiplebaseline design. Training focused on improving judgments related to child care and managing daily stress. The impact of training was examined in relation to problem-solving skill improvements, as well as social insularity, affect, and stress which appeared to compromise child care abilities. Problem-solving training resulted in a substantial increase in generation of alternative solutions and in the quality of plans to implement solutions on both training and generalization vignettes. Moreover, training resulted in positive changes in social insularity, negative affect, and self-reported stress and anxiety. Most of these gains were maintained at 1- and 5-month follow-ups. There were no further reports of child maltreatment during the 21 months following intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-326
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Family Violence
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1988

Fingerprint

Mothers
Child Care
child care
maltreatment of children
Aptitude
Child Abuse
compromise
parents
Anxiety
Parents
anxiety
ability

Keywords

  • neglect
  • parenting
  • physical abuse
  • problem solving
  • skill training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

Problem-solving training with a multiply distressed abusive and neglectful mother : Effects on social insularity, negative affect, and stress. / MacMillan, Virginia M.; Guevreniont, David C.; Hansen, David J.

In: Journal of Family Violence, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.12.1988, p. 313-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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