Problem signs in law school: Fostering attorney well-being early in professional training

Krystia Reed, Brian H Bornstein, Andrew B. Jeon, Lindsey E. Wylie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Attorneys suffer from high rates of stress, alcoholism, and mental health problems that are costly for the legal system and impair their abilities to serve their clients. There is some indication that these problems begin in law school. The present study assessed a cohort of law students at an American law school for their reported levels of stress, depression, anxiety, substance use, and overall adjustment/coping. Findings indicate that law students suffer from high levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and alcohol use, and that these problem behaviors fluctuate throughout the course of law school. We discuss the implications for law student/lawyer well-being and legal education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-156
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Law and Psychiatry
Volume47
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Lawyers
Foster Home Care
school law
well-being
Students
Law
Anxiety
Depression
anxiety
Social Adjustment
Aptitude
student
legal system
alcoholism
lawyer
Alcoholism
indication
Mental Health
coping
mental health

Keywords

  • Attorney mental health
  • Law school
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Law

Cite this

Problem signs in law school : Fostering attorney well-being early in professional training. / Reed, Krystia; Bornstein, Brian H; Jeon, Andrew B.; Wylie, Lindsey E.

In: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, Vol. 47, 01.07.2016, p. 148-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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