Prevalence of morphologic defects in spermatozoa from beef bulls

K. R. Johnson, C. E. Dewey, J. K. Bobo, Clayton L Kelling, D. D. Lunstra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine the overall prevalence of morphologic defects in spermatozoa from beef bulls and to determine whether prevalence varies with the age of the bull. Design - Cross-sectional observational study. Animals - 2,497 beef bulls that were evaluated for breeding soundness in 1994 by 29 practicing veterinarians in a 5-state geographic region. Procedure - Slides of spermatozoa from each bull were made and submitted by practicing veterinarians for morphologic evaluation. One hundred spermatozoa per slide were examined, and each was classified as having 1 of 9 morphologic defects or as normal. Results - 63% of bulls evaluated were 10 to 12 months old, and 20% were 13 to 18 months old. A mean of 70.6% of spermatozoa was classified as normal. Most common defects were proximal droplets (8.4%), distal midpiece reflexes (6.7%), separated heads (5.5%), and distal droplets (3.8%). Other defects were seen < 2% of the time. Bulls 10 to 12 months of age had a higher prevalence of proximal and distal droplet defects than older bulls. Clinical Implications - Practitioners conducting breeding soundness evaluations in beef bulls must be aware of common spermatozoal defects. Bulls that are evaluated at a young age will have more defects than older bulls and should be reevaluated, particularly for those defects for which prevalence decreases with age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1468-1471
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume213
Issue number10
StatePublished - Nov 15 1998

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beef bulls
Spermatozoa
bulls
spermatozoa
Veterinarians
Breeding
breeding soundness
droplets
veterinarians
Observational Studies
Reflex
Cross-Sectional Studies
Head
observational studies
Red Meat
reflexes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Johnson, K. R., Dewey, C. E., Bobo, J. K., Kelling, C. L., & Lunstra, D. D. (1998). Prevalence of morphologic defects in spermatozoa from beef bulls. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 213(10), 1468-1471.

Prevalence of morphologic defects in spermatozoa from beef bulls. / Johnson, K. R.; Dewey, C. E.; Bobo, J. K.; Kelling, Clayton L; Lunstra, D. D.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 213, No. 10, 15.11.1998, p. 1468-1471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, KR, Dewey, CE, Bobo, JK, Kelling, CL & Lunstra, DD 1998, 'Prevalence of morphologic defects in spermatozoa from beef bulls', Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 213, no. 10, pp. 1468-1471.
Johnson, K. R. ; Dewey, C. E. ; Bobo, J. K. ; Kelling, Clayton L ; Lunstra, D. D. / Prevalence of morphologic defects in spermatozoa from beef bulls. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 1998 ; Vol. 213, No. 10. pp. 1468-1471.
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