Prevalence of Diagnosis and Staging of Chronic Kidney Disease by Primary Care Providers in a Rural State

Suneetha Muthyala, Abe E. Sahmoun, Ketki K Tendulkar, Byron Danielson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: The Kidney Disease Outcomes and Quality Initiative guidelines are the most widely disseminated guidelines regarding the clinical evaluation and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Purpose: Assess the prevalence of diagnosis and staging of CKD by primary care providers (PCPs). Methods: For the purpose of this assessment, stage 3 CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) between 30 and 59 mL/min/1.73 m2 for at least 3 months. Eligible individuals were 1447 white, nondiabetic patients 40-74 years of age. Results: Information on a random sample of 110 patients was analyzed. Chronic kidney disease was reported in 22% of the patients, whereas only 7% of patients had both CKD and stage 3 reported in their medical record. PCPs were significantly more likely to record CKD in male than in female patients (79% vs 34%; P <.001). Patients who had CKD recorded were significantly more likely to be referred to a nephrologist (46% vs 3%; P <.001). Even among patients who had a diagnosis of coronary artery disease, were older, or had lower eGFR, a diagnosis of CKD was less likely to be recorded. Only 22% had their serum phosphorus, 12% their parathyroid hormone, and 64% a urinalysis recorded. Conclusions: This study found that the prevalence of recording CKD and staging by PCPs was low. Primary care providers were more likely to record CKD in male than in female patients. Finally, testing for bone disease is underperformed. There is a need to identify mechanisms to improve evaluation and management of CKD by PCPs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-162
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Primary Care & Community Health
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Primary Health Care
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Guidelines
Urinalysis
Bone Diseases
Kidney Diseases
Parathyroid Hormone
Phosphorus
Medical Records
Coronary Artery Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • KDOQI guidelines
  • chronic kidney disease
  • nondiabetics
  • primary care providers
  • reported diagnosis
  • reported stage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Prevalence of Diagnosis and Staging of Chronic Kidney Disease by Primary Care Providers in a Rural State. / Muthyala, Suneetha; Sahmoun, Abe E.; Tendulkar, Ketki K; Danielson, Byron.

In: Journal of Primary Care & Community Health, Vol. 2, No. 3, 07.2011, p. 157-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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