Preferential activation for emotional Western classical music versus emotional environmental sounds in motor, interoceptive, and language brain areas

Rebecca J. Lepping, Jared M. Bruce, Kathleen M. Gustafson, Jinxiang Hu, Laura E. Martin, Cary R. Savage, Ruth Ann Atchley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent meta analyses suggest there is a common brain network involved in processing emotion in music and sounds. However, no studies have directly compared the neural substrates of equivalent emotional Western classical music and emotional environmental sounds. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we investigated whether brain activation in motor cortex, interoceptive cortex, and Broca's language area during an auditory emotional appraisal task differed as a function of stimulus type. Activation was relatively greater to music in motor and interoceptive cortex – areas associated with movement and internal physical feelings – and relatively greater to emotional environmental sounds in Broca's area. We conclude that emotional environmental sounds are appraised through verbal identification of the source, and that emotional Western classical music is appraised through evaluation of bodily feelings. While there is clearly a common core emotion-processing network underlying all emotional appraisal, modality-specific contextual information may be important for understanding the contribution of voluntary versus automatic appraisal mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number103593
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume136
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2019

Fingerprint

Music
Emotions
Language
Motor Cortex
Brain
Meta-Analysis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Classical music
Emotion
Activation
Sound
Broca Area

Keywords

  • Emotion
  • Interoception
  • Language
  • Motor
  • Music
  • Sound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Preferential activation for emotional Western classical music versus emotional environmental sounds in motor, interoceptive, and language brain areas. / Lepping, Rebecca J.; Bruce, Jared M.; Gustafson, Kathleen M.; Hu, Jinxiang; Martin, Laura E.; Savage, Cary R.; Atchley, Ruth Ann.

In: Brain and Cognition, Vol. 136, 103593, 11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lepping, Rebecca J. ; Bruce, Jared M. ; Gustafson, Kathleen M. ; Hu, Jinxiang ; Martin, Laura E. ; Savage, Cary R. ; Atchley, Ruth Ann. / Preferential activation for emotional Western classical music versus emotional environmental sounds in motor, interoceptive, and language brain areas. In: Brain and Cognition. 2019 ; Vol. 136.
@article{ad23f07e0bec46c9a0b2bab73ed9913e,
title = "Preferential activation for emotional Western classical music versus emotional environmental sounds in motor, interoceptive, and language brain areas",
abstract = "Recent meta analyses suggest there is a common brain network involved in processing emotion in music and sounds. However, no studies have directly compared the neural substrates of equivalent emotional Western classical music and emotional environmental sounds. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we investigated whether brain activation in motor cortex, interoceptive cortex, and Broca's language area during an auditory emotional appraisal task differed as a function of stimulus type. Activation was relatively greater to music in motor and interoceptive cortex – areas associated with movement and internal physical feelings – and relatively greater to emotional environmental sounds in Broca's area. We conclude that emotional environmental sounds are appraised through verbal identification of the source, and that emotional Western classical music is appraised through evaluation of bodily feelings. While there is clearly a common core emotion-processing network underlying all emotional appraisal, modality-specific contextual information may be important for understanding the contribution of voluntary versus automatic appraisal mechanisms.",
keywords = "Emotion, Interoception, Language, Motor, Music, Sound",
author = "Lepping, {Rebecca J.} and Bruce, {Jared M.} and Gustafson, {Kathleen M.} and Jinxiang Hu and Martin, {Laura E.} and Savage, {Cary R.} and Atchley, {Ruth Ann}",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.bandc.2019.103593",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "136",
journal = "Brain and Cognition",
issn = "0278-2626",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Preferential activation for emotional Western classical music versus emotional environmental sounds in motor, interoceptive, and language brain areas

AU - Lepping, Rebecca J.

AU - Bruce, Jared M.

AU - Gustafson, Kathleen M.

AU - Hu, Jinxiang

AU - Martin, Laura E.

AU - Savage, Cary R.

AU - Atchley, Ruth Ann

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - Recent meta analyses suggest there is a common brain network involved in processing emotion in music and sounds. However, no studies have directly compared the neural substrates of equivalent emotional Western classical music and emotional environmental sounds. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we investigated whether brain activation in motor cortex, interoceptive cortex, and Broca's language area during an auditory emotional appraisal task differed as a function of stimulus type. Activation was relatively greater to music in motor and interoceptive cortex – areas associated with movement and internal physical feelings – and relatively greater to emotional environmental sounds in Broca's area. We conclude that emotional environmental sounds are appraised through verbal identification of the source, and that emotional Western classical music is appraised through evaluation of bodily feelings. While there is clearly a common core emotion-processing network underlying all emotional appraisal, modality-specific contextual information may be important for understanding the contribution of voluntary versus automatic appraisal mechanisms.

AB - Recent meta analyses suggest there is a common brain network involved in processing emotion in music and sounds. However, no studies have directly compared the neural substrates of equivalent emotional Western classical music and emotional environmental sounds. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we investigated whether brain activation in motor cortex, interoceptive cortex, and Broca's language area during an auditory emotional appraisal task differed as a function of stimulus type. Activation was relatively greater to music in motor and interoceptive cortex – areas associated with movement and internal physical feelings – and relatively greater to emotional environmental sounds in Broca's area. We conclude that emotional environmental sounds are appraised through verbal identification of the source, and that emotional Western classical music is appraised through evaluation of bodily feelings. While there is clearly a common core emotion-processing network underlying all emotional appraisal, modality-specific contextual information may be important for understanding the contribution of voluntary versus automatic appraisal mechanisms.

KW - Emotion

KW - Interoception

KW - Language

KW - Motor

KW - Music

KW - Sound

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070284032&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85070284032&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bandc.2019.103593

DO - 10.1016/j.bandc.2019.103593

M3 - Article

C2 - 31404816

AN - SCOPUS:85070284032

VL - 136

JO - Brain and Cognition

JF - Brain and Cognition

SN - 0278-2626

M1 - 103593

ER -