Predictors of practitioner self-reported use of evidence-based practices

Practitioner training, clinical setting, and attitudes toward research

Timothy D Nelson, Ric G. Steele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In light of the recent movement toward evidence-based practice (EBP) in mental health services, practitioner adoption of EBPs in clinical settings has emerged as an important area for study. This paper reports on the results of a national online survey of mental health practitioners in an attempt to identify correlates of self-reported EBP use in practice. The survey consisted of 214 mental health practitioners from 15 states drawn from a diverse set of clinical settings and representing a variety of theoretical orientations. The results indicated that practitioner training (i.e., taking a class in EBPs), the perceived openness of the clinical setting toward EBPs, and the practitioner's attitudes toward treatment research were significant predictors of self-reported EBP use. The relationship between clinical setting and EBP use was partially mediated by attitudes toward treatment research. Negative attitudes toward treatment research partially mediated the relationship between practitioner training and self-reported EBP use. The findings are presented within the context of efforts to increase EBP use in clinical settings and implications for clinical training, treatment research, and EBP dissemination efforts are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-330
Number of pages12
JournalAdministration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

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Evidence-Based Practice
Research
Mental Health
Mental Health Services

Keywords

  • Dissemination
  • Evidence-based practice
  • Institutional culture
  • Practitioner attitudes
  • Training
  • Treatment research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

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