Predictors of Change in Self-Reported Social Networks Among Homeless Young People

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research investigates changes in social network size and composition of 351 homeless adolescents over 3 years. Findings show that network size decreases over time. Homeless youth with a conduct disorder begin street life with small networks that remain small over time. Caregiver abuse is associated with smaller emotional networks due to fewer home ties, especially to parents, and a more rapid loss of emotional home ties over time. Homeless youth with major depression start out with small networks, but are more likely to maintain network ties. Youth with substance abuse problems are more likely to maintain instrumental home ties. Finally, homeless adolescents tend to reconnect with their parents for instrumental aid and form romantic relationship that provide emotional support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)827-841
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Fingerprint

Social Support
Homeless Youth
social network
Parents
Conduct Disorder
parents
Caregivers
Substance-Related Disorders
adolescent
Depression
substance abuse
caregiver
Research
abuse
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Predictors of Change in Self-Reported Social Networks Among Homeless Young People. / Falci, Christina D; Whitbeck, Leslie B; Hoyt, Danny R; Rose, Trina.

In: Journal of Research on Adolescence, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.12.2011, p. 827-841.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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