Predictors and respiratory depositions of airborne endotoxin in homes using biomass fuels and LPG gas for cooking

Bijaya K. Padhi, Atin Adhikari, Prakasini Satapathy, Alok K. Patra, Dinesh Chandel, Pinaki Panigrahi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have highlighted the presence of endotoxin in indoor air and its role in respiratory morbidities. Burning of household fuels including unprocessed wood and dried animal dung could be a major source of endotoxin in homes. We measured endotoxin levels in different size fractions of airborne particles (PM10, PM2.5, and PM1), and estimated the deposition of particle-bound endotoxin in the respiratory tract. The study was carried out in homes burning solid biomass fuel (n=35) and LPG (n=35). Sample filters were analyzed for endotoxin and organic carbon (OC) content. Household characteristics including temperature, relative humidity, and carbon dioxide levels were also recorded. Multivariate regression models were used to estimate the contributing factors for airborne endotoxin. Respiratory deposition doses were calculated using a computer-based model. We found a higher endotoxin concentration in PM2.5 fractions of the particle in both LPG (median: 110, interquartile range (IQR) 100–120 EU/m3) and biomass (median: 350, IQR: 315–430 EU/m3) burning homes. In the multivariate-adjusted model, burning of solid biomass fuel (β: 67; 95% CI: 10.5–124) emerged as the most significant predictor followed by OC (β: 4.7; 95% CI: 2.7–6.8), RH (β: 1.6; 95% CI: 0.76–2.4), and PM2.5 (β: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.11–0.78) for airborne endotoxin (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 9 2016

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Penicillin G Benzathine
Liquefied petroleum gas
Cooking
Endotoxins
Biomass
Gases
Organic carbon
Atmospheric humidity
Carbon dioxide
Wood
Animals
Carbon
Air
Humidity
Carbon Dioxide
Respiratory System
Computer Simulation
Morbidity
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Toxicology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Predictors and respiratory depositions of airborne endotoxin in homes using biomass fuels and LPG gas for cooking. / Padhi, Bijaya K.; Adhikari, Atin; Satapathy, Prakasini; Patra, Alok K.; Chandel, Dinesh; Panigrahi, Pinaki.

In: Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, 09.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Padhi, Bijaya K. ; Adhikari, Atin ; Satapathy, Prakasini ; Patra, Alok K. ; Chandel, Dinesh ; Panigrahi, Pinaki. / Predictors and respiratory depositions of airborne endotoxin in homes using biomass fuels and LPG gas for cooking. In: Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. 2016.
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