Predictive Factors Associated with In-Hospital Mortality for Patients Across the Sepsis Spectrum

Lorena Baccaglini, Ozgur M. Araz, Zaeema Naveed, Ben Whitsitt, Micah Beachy, Tammy Winterboer, Gleb Haynatzki, Michael Ash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction Sepsis poses a large burden for hospitals across the world owing to its high resource utilization and poor patient outcomes. This project aimed to assess and quantify the importance of sepsis-specific predictors for in-hospital mortality. Several studies have identified comorbidities and clinical laboratory variables associated with mortality among the severe sepsis population, but few have combined the 2 in making a model specific for all sepsis patients. Methods We used clinical and laboratory variables seen at the time of first lactic acid measurement and patient characteristics upon admission to develop a logistic regression model to predict mortality in a sepsis population at 2 area hospitals in Omaha, Nebraska. Results Overall, sepsis-related mortality was 12.9%. Advanced age, a higher number of comorbidities, and leucopenia were positively associated with mortality, whereas preexisting diabetes was negatively associated with mortality. Each 1 mmol/L difference in lactic acid levels was positively associated with 1.38 times higher adjusted odds (95% confidence interval, 1.30-1.48) of mortality after adjustment for other covariates. For every 1% decrease in hematocrit, the adjusted odds of mortality were 1.04 times higher (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.06). Conclusions We identified a number of sepsis mortality predictors. The negative association between preexisting diabetes mellitus and sepsis mortality requires further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-277
Number of pages5
JournalInfectious Diseases in Clinical Practice
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

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Hospital Mortality
Sepsis
Mortality
Comorbidity
Lactic Acid
Logistic Models
Confidence Intervals
Leukopenia
Hematocrit
Population
Diabetes Mellitus

Keywords

  • critical care
  • epidemiology
  • inpatient
  • mortality
  • predictors
  • sepsis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Predictive Factors Associated with In-Hospital Mortality for Patients Across the Sepsis Spectrum. / Baccaglini, Lorena; Araz, Ozgur M.; Naveed, Zaeema; Whitsitt, Ben; Beachy, Micah; Winterboer, Tammy; Haynatzki, Gleb; Ash, Michael.

In: Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice, Vol. 27, No. 5, 01.09.2019, p. 273-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baccaglini, Lorena ; Araz, Ozgur M. ; Naveed, Zaeema ; Whitsitt, Ben ; Beachy, Micah ; Winterboer, Tammy ; Haynatzki, Gleb ; Ash, Michael. / Predictive Factors Associated with In-Hospital Mortality for Patients Across the Sepsis Spectrum. In: Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice. 2019 ; Vol. 27, No. 5. pp. 273-277.
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