Predicting the need for early tracheostomy: A multifactorial analysis of 992 intubated trauma patients

Claudia E. Goettler, Jonathan R. Fugo, Michael R. Bard, Mark A. Newell, Scott G. Sagraves, Eric A. Toschlog, Paul J. Schenarts, Michael F. Rotondo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Tracheostomy has few, severe risks, while prolonged endotracheal intubation causes morbidity. The need for tracheostomy was assessed, based on early clinical parameters. Methods: Adult trauma patients (January 1994-August 2004), intubated for resuscitation, ventilated >24 hours, were retrospectively evaluated for demographics, physiology, brain, and pulmonary injury. Tracheostomy patients were compared with those without. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, and multivariate logistic regression were used with statistical significance at p < 0.05.* Results: Of 992 patients, 430 (43%) underwent tracheostomy at 9.22 ± 5.7 days. Risk factors were age (45.6* ± 18.8 vs. 36.7 ± 15.9, OR: 2.1 (18 years increments), ISS (30.3* ± 12.5 vs. 22.0 ± 10.3, OR: 2.1 (12u increments), damage control (DC) [68%*(n = 51) vs. 32%*(n = 51), OR: 3.8], craniotomy [70%*(n = 21) versus 30%(n = 9), OR: 2.6], and intracranial pressure monitor (ICP) [65.4%*(n = 87) vs. 34.6 %(n = 46), OR: 2.1]. A 100% tracheostomy rate (n = 30, 3.0%) occurred with ISS (injury severity score) = 75, ISS ≥50, and age ≥55, admit/24 hour GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale) = 3 and age ≥70, AIS abdomen, chest or extremities ≥5 and age ≥60, bilateral pulmonary contusions (BPC) and ≥8 rib fractures, craniotomy and age ≥50, craniotomy with intracranial pressure (ICP) and age ≥40, or craniotomy and GCS ≤4 at 24 hour. A tracheostomy rate of ≥90% (n = 105, 10.6%) was found with ISS ≥54, ESS ≥40, and age ≥40, admit/24 hour GCS = 3 and age ≥55, paralysis and age ≥40, BPC and age ≥55. A tracheostomy rate ≥80% (n = 248, 25.0%) occurred with ISS ≥38, age ≥80, admit/24 hour GCS = 3 and age ≥45, DC and age ≥50, BPC and age ≥50, aspiration and age ≥55, craniotomy with ICP, craniotomy with GCS ≤9 at 24 hour. Conclusion: Discrete risk factors predict the need for tracheostomy for trauma patients. We recommend that patients with ≥90% risk undergo early tracheostomy and that it is considered in the ≥80% risk group to potentially decreased morbidity, increased patient comfort, and optimize resource utilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)991-996
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume60
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2006

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Tracheostomy
Craniotomy
Glasgow Coma Scale
Injury Severity Score
Wounds and Injuries
Contusions
Intracranial Pressure
Lung
Rib Fractures
Morbidity
Intratracheal Intubation
Lung Injury
Resuscitation
Paralysis
Abdomen
Brain Injuries
Thorax
Extremities
Logistic Models
Demography

Keywords

  • Prediction
  • Tracheostomy
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Goettler, C. E., Fugo, J. R., Bard, M. R., Newell, M. A., Sagraves, S. G., Toschlog, E. A., ... Rotondo, M. F. (2006). Predicting the need for early tracheostomy: A multifactorial analysis of 992 intubated trauma patients. Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, 60(5), 991-996. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.ta.0000217270.16860.32

Predicting the need for early tracheostomy : A multifactorial analysis of 992 intubated trauma patients. / Goettler, Claudia E.; Fugo, Jonathan R.; Bard, Michael R.; Newell, Mark A.; Sagraves, Scott G.; Toschlog, Eric A.; Schenarts, Paul J.; Rotondo, Michael F.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 60, No. 5, 01.05.2006, p. 991-996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goettler, Claudia E. ; Fugo, Jonathan R. ; Bard, Michael R. ; Newell, Mark A. ; Sagraves, Scott G. ; Toschlog, Eric A. ; Schenarts, Paul J. ; Rotondo, Michael F. / Predicting the need for early tracheostomy : A multifactorial analysis of 992 intubated trauma patients. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 2006 ; Vol. 60, No. 5. pp. 991-996.
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abstract = "Background: Tracheostomy has few, severe risks, while prolonged endotracheal intubation causes morbidity. The need for tracheostomy was assessed, based on early clinical parameters. Methods: Adult trauma patients (January 1994-August 2004), intubated for resuscitation, ventilated >24 hours, were retrospectively evaluated for demographics, physiology, brain, and pulmonary injury. Tracheostomy patients were compared with those without. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, and multivariate logistic regression were used with statistical significance at p < 0.05.* Results: Of 992 patients, 430 (43{\%}) underwent tracheostomy at 9.22 ± 5.7 days. Risk factors were age (45.6* ± 18.8 vs. 36.7 ± 15.9, OR: 2.1 (18 years increments), ISS (30.3* ± 12.5 vs. 22.0 ± 10.3, OR: 2.1 (12u increments), damage control (DC) [68{\%}*(n = 51) vs. 32{\%}*(n = 51), OR: 3.8], craniotomy [70{\%}*(n = 21) versus 30{\%}(n = 9), OR: 2.6], and intracranial pressure monitor (ICP) [65.4{\%}*(n = 87) vs. 34.6 {\%}(n = 46), OR: 2.1]. A 100{\%} tracheostomy rate (n = 30, 3.0{\%}) occurred with ISS (injury severity score) = 75, ISS ≥50, and age ≥55, admit/24 hour GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale) = 3 and age ≥70, AIS abdomen, chest or extremities ≥5 and age ≥60, bilateral pulmonary contusions (BPC) and ≥8 rib fractures, craniotomy and age ≥50, craniotomy with intracranial pressure (ICP) and age ≥40, or craniotomy and GCS ≤4 at 24 hour. A tracheostomy rate of ≥90{\%} (n = 105, 10.6{\%}) was found with ISS ≥54, ESS ≥40, and age ≥40, admit/24 hour GCS = 3 and age ≥55, paralysis and age ≥40, BPC and age ≥55. A tracheostomy rate ≥80{\%} (n = 248, 25.0{\%}) occurred with ISS ≥38, age ≥80, admit/24 hour GCS = 3 and age ≥45, DC and age ≥50, BPC and age ≥50, aspiration and age ≥55, craniotomy with ICP, craniotomy with GCS ≤9 at 24 hour. Conclusion: Discrete risk factors predict the need for tracheostomy for trauma patients. We recommend that patients with ≥90{\%} risk undergo early tracheostomy and that it is considered in the ≥80{\%} risk group to potentially decreased morbidity, increased patient comfort, and optimize resource utilization.",
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T2 - A multifactorial analysis of 992 intubated trauma patients

AU - Goettler, Claudia E.

AU - Fugo, Jonathan R.

AU - Bard, Michael R.

AU - Newell, Mark A.

AU - Sagraves, Scott G.

AU - Toschlog, Eric A.

AU - Schenarts, Paul J.

AU - Rotondo, Michael F.

PY - 2006/5/1

Y1 - 2006/5/1

N2 - Background: Tracheostomy has few, severe risks, while prolonged endotracheal intubation causes morbidity. The need for tracheostomy was assessed, based on early clinical parameters. Methods: Adult trauma patients (January 1994-August 2004), intubated for resuscitation, ventilated >24 hours, were retrospectively evaluated for demographics, physiology, brain, and pulmonary injury. Tracheostomy patients were compared with those without. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, and multivariate logistic regression were used with statistical significance at p < 0.05.* Results: Of 992 patients, 430 (43%) underwent tracheostomy at 9.22 ± 5.7 days. Risk factors were age (45.6* ± 18.8 vs. 36.7 ± 15.9, OR: 2.1 (18 years increments), ISS (30.3* ± 12.5 vs. 22.0 ± 10.3, OR: 2.1 (12u increments), damage control (DC) [68%*(n = 51) vs. 32%*(n = 51), OR: 3.8], craniotomy [70%*(n = 21) versus 30%(n = 9), OR: 2.6], and intracranial pressure monitor (ICP) [65.4%*(n = 87) vs. 34.6 %(n = 46), OR: 2.1]. A 100% tracheostomy rate (n = 30, 3.0%) occurred with ISS (injury severity score) = 75, ISS ≥50, and age ≥55, admit/24 hour GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale) = 3 and age ≥70, AIS abdomen, chest or extremities ≥5 and age ≥60, bilateral pulmonary contusions (BPC) and ≥8 rib fractures, craniotomy and age ≥50, craniotomy with intracranial pressure (ICP) and age ≥40, or craniotomy and GCS ≤4 at 24 hour. A tracheostomy rate of ≥90% (n = 105, 10.6%) was found with ISS ≥54, ESS ≥40, and age ≥40, admit/24 hour GCS = 3 and age ≥55, paralysis and age ≥40, BPC and age ≥55. A tracheostomy rate ≥80% (n = 248, 25.0%) occurred with ISS ≥38, age ≥80, admit/24 hour GCS = 3 and age ≥45, DC and age ≥50, BPC and age ≥50, aspiration and age ≥55, craniotomy with ICP, craniotomy with GCS ≤9 at 24 hour. Conclusion: Discrete risk factors predict the need for tracheostomy for trauma patients. We recommend that patients with ≥90% risk undergo early tracheostomy and that it is considered in the ≥80% risk group to potentially decreased morbidity, increased patient comfort, and optimize resource utilization.

AB - Background: Tracheostomy has few, severe risks, while prolonged endotracheal intubation causes morbidity. The need for tracheostomy was assessed, based on early clinical parameters. Methods: Adult trauma patients (January 1994-August 2004), intubated for resuscitation, ventilated >24 hours, were retrospectively evaluated for demographics, physiology, brain, and pulmonary injury. Tracheostomy patients were compared with those without. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, and multivariate logistic regression were used with statistical significance at p < 0.05.* Results: Of 992 patients, 430 (43%) underwent tracheostomy at 9.22 ± 5.7 days. Risk factors were age (45.6* ± 18.8 vs. 36.7 ± 15.9, OR: 2.1 (18 years increments), ISS (30.3* ± 12.5 vs. 22.0 ± 10.3, OR: 2.1 (12u increments), damage control (DC) [68%*(n = 51) vs. 32%*(n = 51), OR: 3.8], craniotomy [70%*(n = 21) versus 30%(n = 9), OR: 2.6], and intracranial pressure monitor (ICP) [65.4%*(n = 87) vs. 34.6 %(n = 46), OR: 2.1]. A 100% tracheostomy rate (n = 30, 3.0%) occurred with ISS (injury severity score) = 75, ISS ≥50, and age ≥55, admit/24 hour GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale) = 3 and age ≥70, AIS abdomen, chest or extremities ≥5 and age ≥60, bilateral pulmonary contusions (BPC) and ≥8 rib fractures, craniotomy and age ≥50, craniotomy with intracranial pressure (ICP) and age ≥40, or craniotomy and GCS ≤4 at 24 hour. A tracheostomy rate of ≥90% (n = 105, 10.6%) was found with ISS ≥54, ESS ≥40, and age ≥40, admit/24 hour GCS = 3 and age ≥55, paralysis and age ≥40, BPC and age ≥55. A tracheostomy rate ≥80% (n = 248, 25.0%) occurred with ISS ≥38, age ≥80, admit/24 hour GCS = 3 and age ≥45, DC and age ≥50, BPC and age ≥50, aspiration and age ≥55, craniotomy with ICP, craniotomy with GCS ≤9 at 24 hour. Conclusion: Discrete risk factors predict the need for tracheostomy for trauma patients. We recommend that patients with ≥90% risk undergo early tracheostomy and that it is considered in the ≥80% risk group to potentially decreased morbidity, increased patient comfort, and optimize resource utilization.

KW - Prediction

KW - Tracheostomy

KW - Trauma

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