Power and the creation of patronizing environments: The stereotype-based behaviors of the powerful and their effects on female performance in masculine domains

Theresa K. Vescio, Sarah J. Gervais, Mark Snyder, Ann Hoover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This work tested the following hypothesis: When powerful men stereotype their female subordinates in masculine domains, they behave in patronizing ways that affect the performance of their subordinates. Experiment 1 examined the stereotyping tendencies and patronizing behaviors of the powerful. Findings revealed that powerful men who stereotyped their female subordinates (i.e., those who were weakness focused) gave female subordinates few valued resources but much praise. In Experiment 2, low-power participants received resources (valued or devalued positions) and praise (high or low) from a powerful man. Subordinates who were assigned to a devalued position but received high praise (i.e., the patronizing behavior mirrored from Experiment 1) were angry. However, men performed better in the anger-inspiring situation, whereas women performed worse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)658-672
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume88
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2005

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stereotype
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Keywords

  • Anger and performance
  • Gender differences in performance
  • Patronizing behavior
  • Power
  • Stereotyping and discrimination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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