Potentiostatic deposition of DNA for scanning probe microscopy

S. M. Lindsay, N. J. Tao, J. A. DeRose, P. I. Oden, Yuri L Lyubchenko, R. E. Harrington, L. Shlyakhtenko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe a procedure for reversible adsorption of DNA onto a gold electrode maintained under potential control. The adsorbate can be imaged by scanning probe microscopy in situ. Quantitative control of a molecular adsorbate for microscopy is now possible. We found a potential window (between 0 and 180 mV versus a silver wire quasi reference) over which a gold (111) surface under phosphate buffer is positively charged, but is not covered with a dense adsorbate. When DNA is present in these conditions, molecules adsorb onto the electrode and remain stable under repeated scanning with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). They become removed when the surface is brought to a negative charge. When operated at tunnel currents below approximately 0.4 nA, the STM yields a resolution of approximately 1 nm, which is better than can be obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM) at present. We illustrate this procedure by imaging a series of DNA molecules made by ligating a 21 base-pair oligonucleotide. We observed the expected series of fragment lengths but small fragments are adsorbed preferentially.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1570-1584
Number of pages15
JournalBiophysical journal
Volume61
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

Scanning Probe Microscopy
DNA Probes
Gold
DNA
Electrodes
Atomic Force Microscopy
Silver
Oligonucleotides
Base Pairing
Adsorption
Microscopy
Buffers
Phosphates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

Cite this

Lindsay, S. M., Tao, N. J., DeRose, J. A., Oden, P. I., Lyubchenko, Y. L., Harrington, R. E., & Shlyakhtenko, L. (1992). Potentiostatic deposition of DNA for scanning probe microscopy. Biophysical journal, 61(6), 1570-1584. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-3495(92)81961-6

Potentiostatic deposition of DNA for scanning probe microscopy. / Lindsay, S. M.; Tao, N. J.; DeRose, J. A.; Oden, P. I.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Harrington, R. E.; Shlyakhtenko, L.

In: Biophysical journal, Vol. 61, No. 6, 01.01.1992, p. 1570-1584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lindsay, SM, Tao, NJ, DeRose, JA, Oden, PI, Lyubchenko, YL, Harrington, RE & Shlyakhtenko, L 1992, 'Potentiostatic deposition of DNA for scanning probe microscopy', Biophysical journal, vol. 61, no. 6, pp. 1570-1584. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-3495(92)81961-6
Lindsay, S. M. ; Tao, N. J. ; DeRose, J. A. ; Oden, P. I. ; Lyubchenko, Yuri L ; Harrington, R. E. ; Shlyakhtenko, L. / Potentiostatic deposition of DNA for scanning probe microscopy. In: Biophysical journal. 1992 ; Vol. 61, No. 6. pp. 1570-1584.
@article{d125c49bf7174266a2250d8c00fe82c9,
title = "Potentiostatic deposition of DNA for scanning probe microscopy",
abstract = "We describe a procedure for reversible adsorption of DNA onto a gold electrode maintained under potential control. The adsorbate can be imaged by scanning probe microscopy in situ. Quantitative control of a molecular adsorbate for microscopy is now possible. We found a potential window (between 0 and 180 mV versus a silver wire quasi reference) over which a gold (111) surface under phosphate buffer is positively charged, but is not covered with a dense adsorbate. When DNA is present in these conditions, molecules adsorb onto the electrode and remain stable under repeated scanning with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). They become removed when the surface is brought to a negative charge. When operated at tunnel currents below approximately 0.4 nA, the STM yields a resolution of approximately 1 nm, which is better than can be obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM) at present. We illustrate this procedure by imaging a series of DNA molecules made by ligating a 21 base-pair oligonucleotide. We observed the expected series of fragment lengths but small fragments are adsorbed preferentially.",
author = "Lindsay, {S. M.} and Tao, {N. J.} and DeRose, {J. A.} and Oden, {P. I.} and Lyubchenko, {Yuri L} and Harrington, {R. E.} and L. Shlyakhtenko",
year = "1992",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0006-3495(92)81961-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "61",
pages = "1570--1584",
journal = "Biophysical Journal",
issn = "0006-3495",
publisher = "Biophysical Society",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potentiostatic deposition of DNA for scanning probe microscopy

AU - Lindsay, S. M.

AU - Tao, N. J.

AU - DeRose, J. A.

AU - Oden, P. I.

AU - Lyubchenko, Yuri L

AU - Harrington, R. E.

AU - Shlyakhtenko, L.

PY - 1992/1/1

Y1 - 1992/1/1

N2 - We describe a procedure for reversible adsorption of DNA onto a gold electrode maintained under potential control. The adsorbate can be imaged by scanning probe microscopy in situ. Quantitative control of a molecular adsorbate for microscopy is now possible. We found a potential window (between 0 and 180 mV versus a silver wire quasi reference) over which a gold (111) surface under phosphate buffer is positively charged, but is not covered with a dense adsorbate. When DNA is present in these conditions, molecules adsorb onto the electrode and remain stable under repeated scanning with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). They become removed when the surface is brought to a negative charge. When operated at tunnel currents below approximately 0.4 nA, the STM yields a resolution of approximately 1 nm, which is better than can be obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM) at present. We illustrate this procedure by imaging a series of DNA molecules made by ligating a 21 base-pair oligonucleotide. We observed the expected series of fragment lengths but small fragments are adsorbed preferentially.

AB - We describe a procedure for reversible adsorption of DNA onto a gold electrode maintained under potential control. The adsorbate can be imaged by scanning probe microscopy in situ. Quantitative control of a molecular adsorbate for microscopy is now possible. We found a potential window (between 0 and 180 mV versus a silver wire quasi reference) over which a gold (111) surface under phosphate buffer is positively charged, but is not covered with a dense adsorbate. When DNA is present in these conditions, molecules adsorb onto the electrode and remain stable under repeated scanning with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). They become removed when the surface is brought to a negative charge. When operated at tunnel currents below approximately 0.4 nA, the STM yields a resolution of approximately 1 nm, which is better than can be obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM) at present. We illustrate this procedure by imaging a series of DNA molecules made by ligating a 21 base-pair oligonucleotide. We observed the expected series of fragment lengths but small fragments are adsorbed preferentially.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026717434&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026717434&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0006-3495(92)81961-6

DO - 10.1016/S0006-3495(92)81961-6

M3 - Article

VL - 61

SP - 1570

EP - 1584

JO - Biophysical Journal

JF - Biophysical Journal

SN - 0006-3495

IS - 6

ER -