Potential associations among genetic markers in the serotonergic system and the antisocial alcoholism subtype

E. M. Hill, Scott F Stoltenberg, M. Burmeister, M. Closser, R. A. Zucker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alcoholism is transmitted in families. The complexity and heterogeneity of this disorder has made it difficult to identify specific genetic correlates. One design with the potential to do so is the family-based association study, in which the frequencies of genetic polymorphisms are compared between affected and nonaffected members. Reduced central serotonin neurotransmission is associated with features of an antisocial subtype of alcoholism, although a primary deficit has not been traced to a particular component. Genetic markers related to the sertonergic system have been identified, located, and cloned. If associations can be discovered, the development process for pharmacotherapy could be facilitated. In this review, the evidence for the involvement of the serotonergic system in antisocial alcoholism is examined, and the potential for family-based association studies to identify specific components that may be involved is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-121
Number of pages19
JournalExperimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1999

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Genetic Markers
Alcoholism
Genetic Polymorphisms
Synaptic Transmission
Serotonin
Drug Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Potential associations among genetic markers in the serotonergic system and the antisocial alcoholism subtype. / Hill, E. M.; Stoltenberg, Scott F; Burmeister, M.; Closser, M.; Zucker, R. A.

In: Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.05.1999, p. 103-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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