Post-design LEED certification for commercial and residential structures

Wayne G Jensen, Bruce Fischer, Tim Wentz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

LEED certification of structures is desired by many public and private owners for a variety of reasons. Pursuit of a LEED rating is commonly incorporated into design or construction at the earliest possible opportunity, as the certification process is significantly affected by owner motivation, project goals, and construction constraints. Is it possible to take a building not designed to LEED specifications and modify it as part of the construction process to obtain LEED certification? This article explores LEED certification after initial design has been completed with regard to issues the contractor can influence. LEED certification managed by the contractor appears possible for many commercial and residential structures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-121
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Construction Education and Research
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

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certification
Contractors
Specifications
rating

Keywords

  • LEED certification
  • Sustainable construction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Building and Construction
  • Education

Cite this

Post-design LEED certification for commercial and residential structures. / Jensen, Wayne G; Fischer, Bruce; Wentz, Tim.

In: International Journal of Construction Education and Research, Vol. 3, No. 2, 01.05.2007, p. 109-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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