Polyvictimization, income, and ethnic differences in trauma-related mental health during adolescence

Arthur R. Andrews, Lisa Jobe-Shields, Cristina M. López, Isha W. Metzger, Michael A.R. de Arellano, Ben Saunders, Dean G. Kilpatrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to investigate ethnic differences in trauma-related mental health symptoms among adolescents, and test the mediating and moderating effects of polyvictimization (i.e., number of types of traumas/victimizations experienced by an individual) and household income, respectively. Methods: Data were drawn from the first wave of the National Survey of Adolescents-replication study (NSA-R), which took place in the US in 2005 and utilized random digit dialing to administer a telephone survey to adolescents ages 12–17. Participants included in the current analyses were 3312 adolescents (50.2 % female; mean age 14.67 years) from the original sample of 3614 who identified as non-Hispanic White (n = 2346, 70.8 %), non-Hispanic Black (n = 557, 16.8 %), or Hispanic (n = 409, 12.3 %). Structural equation modeling was utilized to test hypothesized models. Results: Non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic participants reported higher levels of polyvictimization and trauma-related mental health symptoms (symptoms of posttraumatic stress and depression) compared to non-Hispanic Whites, though the effect sizes were small (γ ≤ 0.07). Polyvictimization fully accounted for the differences in mental health symptoms between non-Hispanic Blacks and non-Hispanic Whites, and partially accounted for the differences between Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites. The relation between polyvictimization and trauma-related mental health symptoms was higher for low-income youth than for high-income youth. Conclusions: Disparities in trauma exposure largely accounted for racial/ethnic disparities in trauma-related mental health. Children from low-income family environments appear to be at greater risk of negative mental health outcomes following trauma exposure compared to adolescents from high-income families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1223-1234
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Volume50
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 2015

Fingerprint

adolescence
trauma
Mental Health
mental health
income
Wounds and Injuries
Hispanic Americans
adolescent
low income
Crime Victims
female adolescent
family income
household income
Telephone
victimization
telephone
Depression

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Ethnic minority issues
  • Health disparities
  • PTSD
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Andrews, A. R., Jobe-Shields, L., López, C. M., Metzger, I. W., de Arellano, M. A. R., Saunders, B., & G. Kilpatrick, D. (2015). Polyvictimization, income, and ethnic differences in trauma-related mental health during adolescence. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 50(8), 1223-1234. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-015-1077-3

Polyvictimization, income, and ethnic differences in trauma-related mental health during adolescence. / Andrews, Arthur R.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; López, Cristina M.; Metzger, Isha W.; de Arellano, Michael A.R.; Saunders, Ben; G. Kilpatrick, Dean.

In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Vol. 50, No. 8, 31.08.2015, p. 1223-1234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andrews, AR, Jobe-Shields, L, López, CM, Metzger, IW, de Arellano, MAR, Saunders, B & G. Kilpatrick, D 2015, 'Polyvictimization, income, and ethnic differences in trauma-related mental health during adolescence', Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, vol. 50, no. 8, pp. 1223-1234. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-015-1077-3
Andrews, Arthur R. ; Jobe-Shields, Lisa ; López, Cristina M. ; Metzger, Isha W. ; de Arellano, Michael A.R. ; Saunders, Ben ; G. Kilpatrick, Dean. / Polyvictimization, income, and ethnic differences in trauma-related mental health during adolescence. In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology. 2015 ; Vol. 50, No. 8. pp. 1223-1234.
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