Plant targets for Pseudomonas syringae type III effectors: Virulence targets or guarded decoys?

Anna Block, James R. Alfano

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae can suppress both pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) by the injection of type III effector (T3E) proteins into host cells. T3Es achieve immune suppression using a variety of strategies including interference with immune receptor signaling, blocking RNA pathways and vesicle trafficking, and altering organelle function. T3Es can be recognized indirectly by resistance proteins monitoring specific T3E targets resulting in ETI. It is presently unclear whether the monitored targets represent bona fide virulence targets or guarded decoys. Extensive overlap between PTI and ETI signaling suggests that T3Es may suppress both pathways through common targets and by possessing multiple activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-46
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Microbiology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

Fingerprint

Pseudomonas syringae
Virulence
Immunity
Organelles
Proteins
RNA
Bacteria
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Plant targets for Pseudomonas syringae type III effectors : Virulence targets or guarded decoys? / Block, Anna; Alfano, James R.

In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.02.2011, p. 39-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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