Physical and sexual covictimization from dating partners: A distinct type of intimate abuse?

Jennifer Katz, Jessica Moore, Pamela May

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Covictimized women experience both physical and sexual forms of abuse. The purpose of the present research was to compare covictimized women to those who experienced physical violence only or unwanted sexual activity only from dating partners. Data were collected from two samples of female undergraduates in heterosexual relationships. Covictimization was associated with less general satisfaction (Study 1) and sexual satisfaction (Study 2), more arguing (Study 1) and verbal conflict (Study 2), and more partner psychological aggression (Studies 1 and 2). Overall, findings suggest that dating partner covictimization may be a distinct type of interpersonal abuse that warrants further research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)961-980
Number of pages20
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

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abuse
aggression
violence
experience

Keywords

  • Dating
  • Physical violence
  • Sexual coercion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

Physical and sexual covictimization from dating partners : A distinct type of intimate abuse? / Katz, Jennifer; Moore, Jessica; May, Pamela.

In: Violence Against Women, Vol. 14, No. 8, 01.08.2008, p. 961-980.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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