Physical activity and healthy eating in the after-school environment

Karen J. Coleman, Karly S. Geller, Richard R. Rosenkranz, David A Dzewaltowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: No research to date has extensively described moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and healthful eating (HE) opportunities in the after-school environment. The current study described the quality of the after-school environment for its impact on children's MVPA and HE. METHODS: An alliance of 7 elementary schools and Boys and Girls Clubs who worked with the Cooperative Extension Service in Lawrence, KS, was selected to participate in a larger intervention study. After-school settings were observed for information regarding session type, session context, leader behavior, physical activity, and snack quality using validated instruments such as the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time. Data presented are baseline measures for all sites. RESULTS: Participating children (n = 144) were primarily non-Hispanic white (60%) and in fourth grade (69%). After-school sites offered 4 different sessions per day (active recreation, academic time, nonactive recreation, and enrichment activities). Children were provided with a daily snack. On 36% of the days observed, this snack included fruit, fruit juice, or vegetables. There was significantly more time spent in MVPA during free play sessions (69%) compared to organized adult-led sessions (51%). There was also significantly more discouragement of physical activity during organized adult-led sessions (29%) as compared to the free play sessions (6%). CONCLUSIONS: The quality of after-school programs can be improved by providing fruits and vegetables as snacks; offering more free play activities; training the after-school staff in simple, structured games for use in a variety of indoor and outdoor settings; and training after-school staff to promote and model MVPA and HE in and out of the after-school setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-640
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of School Health
Volume78
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

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eating behavior
Exercise
Snacks
school
Recreation
Eating
vegetables
recreation
Fruit
staff
Healthy Diet
Physical Activity
clubs
fitness
elementary school
Vegetables
school grade
leader
instruction
time

Keywords

  • Child and adolescent health
  • Community health
  • Nutrition and diet
  • Physical fitness and sport
  • Public health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Philosophy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Physical activity and healthy eating in the after-school environment. / Coleman, Karen J.; Geller, Karly S.; Rosenkranz, Richard R.; Dzewaltowski, David A.

In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 78, No. 12, 01.12.2008, p. 633-640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coleman, Karen J. ; Geller, Karly S. ; Rosenkranz, Richard R. ; Dzewaltowski, David A. / Physical activity and healthy eating in the after-school environment. In: Journal of School Health. 2008 ; Vol. 78, No. 12. pp. 633-640.
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