Phosphorus‐31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in humans by spectroscopic imaging

Localized spectroscopy and metabolite imaging

D. B. Twieg, D. J. Meyerhoff, B. Hubesch, K. Roth, D. Sappey‐Marinier, Michael D Boska, J. R. Gober, S. Schaefer, M. W. Weiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In in vivo phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), spectroscopic imaging (SI) can be used as a flexible localization technique, producing spectra from multiple volumes in a single examination. Presented here are phosphorus SI studies of human organs in which a selective‐volume SI reconstruction was used rather than the usual array‐format SI reconstruction. A linear predictor technique was used to estimate the initial points of the free induction decay missing because of the delay needed for phase‐encoding gradients, significantly reducing the baseline artifacts which commonly complicate interpretation of SI spectra. In studies of heart, brain, liver, and kidney, the performance of SI was found to compare favorably with that of ISIS. SI phosphorus metabolite intensity images from a brain tumor patient were obtained at 2 X 2‐cm in‐plane resolution (with “slice” thickness of roughly 16 cm, determined by coil sensitivity) in 34 min, demonstrating the feasibility of obtaining clinically useful metabolite images in clinically reasonable examination times. © 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-305
Number of pages15
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

Fingerprint

Phosphorus
Spectrum Analysis
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Brain Neoplasms
Artifacts
Kidney
Liver
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Twieg, D. B., Meyerhoff, D. J., Hubesch, B., Roth, K., Sappey‐Marinier, D., Boska, M. D., ... Weiner, M. W. (1989). Phosphorus‐31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in humans by spectroscopic imaging: Localized spectroscopy and metabolite imaging. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 12(3), 291-305. https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.1910120302

Phosphorus‐31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in humans by spectroscopic imaging : Localized spectroscopy and metabolite imaging. / Twieg, D. B.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Hubesch, B.; Roth, K.; Sappey‐Marinier, D.; Boska, Michael D; Gober, J. R.; Schaefer, S.; Weiner, M. W.

In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.01.1989, p. 291-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Twieg, DB, Meyerhoff, DJ, Hubesch, B, Roth, K, Sappey‐Marinier, D, Boska, MD, Gober, JR, Schaefer, S & Weiner, MW 1989, 'Phosphorus‐31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in humans by spectroscopic imaging: Localized spectroscopy and metabolite imaging', Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 291-305. https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.1910120302
Twieg, D. B. ; Meyerhoff, D. J. ; Hubesch, B. ; Roth, K. ; Sappey‐Marinier, D. ; Boska, Michael D ; Gober, J. R. ; Schaefer, S. ; Weiner, M. W. / Phosphorus‐31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in humans by spectroscopic imaging : Localized spectroscopy and metabolite imaging. In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 1989 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 291-305.
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