Persistent light to moderate alcohol intake and lung function: A longitudinal study

Monica M. Vasquez, Duane L. Sherrill, Tricia D LeVan, Wayne J. Morgan, Joseph Harold Sisson, Stefano Guerra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Alcohol intake has been inconsistently associated with lung function levels in cross-sectional studies. The goal of our study was to determine whether longitudinally assessed light-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with levels and decline of lung function. We examined data from 1333 adult participants in the population-based Tucson Epidemiological Study of Airway Obstructive Disease. Alcohol intake was assessed with four surveys between 1972 and 1992. Subjects who completed at least two surveys were classified into longitudinal drinking categories (“never”, “inconsistent”, or “persistent drinker”). Spirometric lung function was measured in up to 11 surveys between 1972 and 1992. Random coefficient models were used to test for differences in lung function by drinking categories. After adjustment for sex, age, height, education, BMI categories, smoking status, and pack-years, as compared to never-drinkers, persistent drinkers had higher FVC (coefficient: 157 mL, p < 0.001), but lower FEV1/FVC ratio (−2.3%, p < 0.001). Differences were due to a slower decline of FVC among persistent than among never-drinkers (p = 0.003), and these trends were present independent of smoking status. Inconsistent drinking showed similar, but weaker associations. After adjustment for potential confounders, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a significantly decreased rate of FVC decline over adult life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-71
Number of pages7
JournalAlcohol
Volume67
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

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Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
alcohol
Alcohols
Drinking
Light
Lung
smoking
Smoking
alcohol consumption
cross-sectional study
Alcohol Drinking
Epidemiologic Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education
Disease
trend
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
education

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Lung function
  • Obstruction
  • Restriction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Persistent light to moderate alcohol intake and lung function : A longitudinal study. / Vasquez, Monica M.; Sherrill, Duane L.; LeVan, Tricia D; Morgan, Wayne J.; Sisson, Joseph Harold; Guerra, Stefano.

In: Alcohol, Vol. 67, 03.2018, p. 65-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vasquez, Monica M. ; Sherrill, Duane L. ; LeVan, Tricia D ; Morgan, Wayne J. ; Sisson, Joseph Harold ; Guerra, Stefano. / Persistent light to moderate alcohol intake and lung function : A longitudinal study. In: Alcohol. 2018 ; Vol. 67. pp. 65-71.
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