Pediatric small bowel transplantation: Techniques and outcomes

Wendy J. Grant, Alan Norman Langnas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intestinal failure remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Intestinal transplantation has emerged as a life-saving therapy for selected patients and is now a routine therapeutic tool at some transplant centers. The short-term and long-term survival rates after intestinal transplantation have steadily increased. The complications associated with intestinal transplantation continue to be rejection, infections, and perforations. The technical aspects of the operation have been refined and standardized. New immunosuppressive agents and experience in treating these very ill children have reduced complications and improved survival. This review focuses on patient selection, the surgical techniques for both isolated small bowel and combined liver and small bowel transplantation, postoperative management, and the results achieved to date.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-207
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent opinion in organ transplantation
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 29 2002

Fingerprint

Transplantation
Pediatrics
Child Mortality
Immunosuppressive Agents
Patient Selection
Survival Rate
Morbidity
Transplants
Survival
Liver
Therapeutics
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Pediatric small bowel transplantation : Techniques and outcomes. / Grant, Wendy J.; Langnas, Alan Norman.

In: Current opinion in organ transplantation, Vol. 7, No. 2, 29.08.2002, p. 202-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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