Pediatric auditory brainstem implantation: Surgical, electrophysiologic, and behavioral outcomes

Holly F.B. Teagle, Lillian Henderson, Shuman He, Matthew G. Ewend, Craig A. Buchman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the safety of auditory brainstem implant (ABI) surgery and document the subsequent development of auditory and spoken language skills in children without neurofibromatosis type II (NFII). Design: A prospective, single-subject observational study of ABI in children without NFII was undertaken at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Five children were enrolled under an investigational device exemption sponsored by the investigators. Over 3 years, patient demographics, medical/surgical findings, complications, device mapping, electrophysiologic measures, audiologic outcomes, and speech and language measures were collected. Results: Five children without NFII have received ABIs to date without permanent medical sequelae, although 2 children required treatment after surgery for temporary complications. All children wear their device daily, and the benefits of sound awareness have developed slowly. Intraand postoperative electrophysiologic measures augmented surgical placement and device programming. The slow development of audition skills precipitated limited changes in speech production but had little impact on growth in spoken language. Conclusions: ABI surgery is safe in young children without NFII. Benefits from device use develop slowly and include sound awareness and the use of pattern and timing aspects of sound. These skills may augment progress in speech production but progress in language development is dependent upon visual communication. Further monitoring of this cohort is needed to better delineate the benefits of this intervention in this patient population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-336
Number of pages11
JournalEar and hearing
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Auditory Brain Stem Implantation
Neurofibromatosis 2
Auditory Brain Stem Implants
Pediatrics
Equipment and Supplies
Language
Language Development
Hearing
Observational Studies
Communication
Research Personnel
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Safety

Keywords

  • Auditory brainstem implant
  • Pediatric outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Pediatric auditory brainstem implantation : Surgical, electrophysiologic, and behavioral outcomes. / Teagle, Holly F.B.; Henderson, Lillian; He, Shuman; Ewend, Matthew G.; Buchman, Craig A.

In: Ear and hearing, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.01.2018, p. 326-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Teagle, Holly F.B. ; Henderson, Lillian ; He, Shuman ; Ewend, Matthew G. ; Buchman, Craig A. / Pediatric auditory brainstem implantation : Surgical, electrophysiologic, and behavioral outcomes. In: Ear and hearing. 2018 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 326-336.
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