Peanut oil is not allergenic to peanut-sensitive individuals

Steve L. Taylor, William W. Busse, Martin I. Sachs, J. L. Parker, John W. Yunginger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ten peanut-sensitive patients were enrolled in a double-blind crossover trial to determine whether ingestion of peanut oil can induce adverse reactions in such individuals. All patients had experienced prior allergic reactions to peanut ingestion, including any of the following: generalized urticaria, angioedema, abdominal cramps, vomiting, diarrhea, bronchospasm, or shock. All patients had elevated levels of serum IgE antibodies to both crude peanut extract and the purified peanut allergen, Peanut-I, by RAST assay; binding values ranged from 2 to 26 times that of negative control serum. All patients demonstrated negative puncture skin tests to both peanut oil and olive oil (control). At 30-min intervals, patients ingested 1, 2, and 5 m/ of either oil contained in 1 m/ capsules while under constant observation. These quantities exceed the maximum estimated dose of peanut oil that would occur in single meals. Patients returned 2 wk later for ingestion challenge with the remaining oil. No untoward reactions were observed with either peanut oil or olive oil. Peanut oil ingestion does not pose a risk to peanut-sensitive individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-375
Number of pages4
JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume68
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1981

Fingerprint

Eating
Oils
Angioedema
Bronchial Spasm
Colic
Urticaria
Skin Tests
Complex Mixtures
Serum
Punctures
Allergens
Cross-Over Studies
Immunoglobulin E
Capsules
Vomiting
Meals
arachis oil
Arachis
Diarrhea
Shock

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Peanut oil is not allergenic to peanut-sensitive individuals. / Taylor, Steve L.; Busse, William W.; Sachs, Martin I.; Parker, J. L.; Yunginger, John W.

In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 68, No. 5, 11.1981, p. 372-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taylor, Steve L. ; Busse, William W. ; Sachs, Martin I. ; Parker, J. L. ; Yunginger, John W. / Peanut oil is not allergenic to peanut-sensitive individuals. In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 1981 ; Vol. 68, No. 5. pp. 372-375.
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